Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Love Your Kidneys!

Keep Calm & Love Your Kidneys during National Kidney Month! <3

 

It is National Kidney Month, which means
that it is time for you to understand the
importance of managing kidney disease and
how to achieve optimal kidney health so
that you can appreciate these wonderful
organs and keep them healthy.
Diet & Kidney Disease
Managing kidney disease—especially at the
beginning—is essential. You want to ensure
proper nutrition while minimizing stress
and maximizing kidney function. There is
no one special diet for everyone, though.
Your diet depends on your medical history,
lifestyle habits, and current kidney function.
Your diet may change over time, depending
on your kidney health. There are some
nutrients that you need to watch out for,
including protein, energy foods, sodium,
potassium, phosphorus, and fluids.
Protein
Foods such as meat, fish, poultry, soy, beans,
and lentils, for example, are rich protein
sources. When protein is broken down,
it creates the waste product urea. Your
body needs to eliminate urea, which must
be filtered through your kidneys. If you
consume high amounts of protein, you
can increase stress on the kidneys due to
increased levels of urea produced. If the urea
fails to be eliminated, it will cause increased

blood-urea levels. High amounts of urea
can lead to fatigue, headaches, nausea, and
a bad taste in your mouth. However, if you
do not eat enough protein, your body will
have a tough time fighting infections, you
will have low energy levels, and you will
lose muscle mass. The amount of protein
that you need to consume depends on your
disease state and treatment regimen. Speak
to your dietitian to review your specific
needs.
Energy Foods
Your energy foods are all the foods that
provide you with energy or calories. These
include carb choices such as fruits, starches,
grains, sugars, and vegetables, as well as fats
and oils. If you are restricting your energy
intake from protein, you need to make sure
to replace those calories from other sources
in order to keep up your energy levels and
maintain a healthy body weight.
Sodium
Since sodium affects your bodily fluids and
blood pressure, it is important to limit your
intake. Watch your intake of high-sodium
foods, including processed foods, deli meats,
canned foods, convenient foods, fast foods,
salty snacks, and so forth. Consider using
other ways to enhance flavors, such as
lemon, spices, and herbs.

Potassium
Potassium is important for your muscles and nerves
to function. Too much or too little potassium in your
blood can affect your heart beat. Whether you need
to limit your intake or even increase your intake
depends on your disease state, kidney function, and
treatment plan. Treatments like dialysis will affect the
amount that you should be consuming, as will certain
medications. Your doctor will let you know, and your
dietitian can work with you to create an appropriate
meal plan. Foods that are high in potassium include
sweet potatoes, squash, bananas, oranges, tomatoes,
and beans.
Phosphorus
Phosphorus plays an important role in keeping your
bones healthy and strong. However, as your kidney
function declines, the phosphate levels in your blood
will increase. This can result in itchiness and joint
pain, as well as loss of calcium in your bones. You
may need to limit your intake of foods that are high
in phosphorus, such as dairy products and protein
foods.
Make sure to speak with a dietitian to help you
develop a meal plan that includes some of these
foods in levels that are right for you, as these foods
contain many important nutrients that you still need
to consume. Also, make sure to read ingredient labels
for hidden sources of phosphorus. Some processed
foods such as deli meats and sodas may contain
phosphates, phosphoric acid, or sodium phosphate

Calcium & Vitamin D
These supplements are essential for good bone
health. Your bones are comprised mostly of calcium,
and you need vitamin D to help absorb it. However,
with diminished kidney function, your kidneys may
not be able to convert vitamin D into its active form.
Therefore, your doctor may recommend that you take
some active vitamin-D and calcium supplements.
Your doctor will be monitoring your blood-calcium
levels, though, so make sure to take these only as
prescribed.
Fluids
Your body needs fluids to survive, but if your kidneys
are not working properly, you may need to reduce
your intake. As your kidney function declines,
they produce less urine, leading to increased fluid
retention. This can cause swelling in your extremities
and face and may also increase your blood pressure
and cause difficulty breathing. However, limit your
intake only as advised by your doctor. Getting too
little fluids can damage your kidneys.
Optimal nutrition is important to prevent
malnutrition, have good energy levels throughout
the day for performing daily tasks, maintain a healthy
weight, and prevent muscle loss, as well as preventing
infection. These are all great reasons to manage and
reduce your risks of kidney disease.
Other ways of reducing your risk of developing
kidney disease are by decreasing your risk of

developing chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart
disease. We discussed a bit about managing diabetes
during Diabetes Awareness Month in November and
touched on Heart Health last month. Now, we will
discuss why it is important to ensure optimal health
and properly manage your kidney disease.
Diabetes
One of the most common causes of end-stage renal
disease or kidney disease is uncontrolled diabetes.
Firstly, you should understand a bit more about
how your kidneys act as a filtration system. Your
body requires a certain amount of protein each
day. After consuming the protein, your body digests
it and absorbs the essential components into the
blood stream, while needing to eliminate the waste
products. The components of the broken-down
protein get filtered through tiny capillaries and then
through even tinier holes called “nephrons.” The
blood flows through all these tiny filters, but the
essential protein components, red blood cells, and
other important substances that are too big to be
able to pass through do not get eliminated, so they
get filtered out. The waste products are able to flow
through the nephrons and therefore enter the urine
to be eliminated.
Unfortunately, uncontrolled diabetes complicates
this process. Whether your insulin is not working
properly or you just don’t have enough, having high
blood sugar puts a lot of stress on your kidneys. When
sugar levels in your blood are abundant, your kidneys
have to filter a lot more blood, making the filters
work much harder. Eventually, the kidneys begin
to leak from all the pressure, resulting in protein
leaking through into the urine. As long as bloodsugar levels are high, further stress and damage on
your kidneys’ filtering system continues. This leads
to further damage, loss in filtration ability, buildup
of waste products, and eventually kidney failure.
Unfortunately, at this point, your only options are a
kidney transplant or dialysis.
High Blood Pressure
Kidneys are made up of many blood vessels that
get smaller and smaller as you get deeper into
their filtering system. Because kidneys have a very
important role in filtering all of the blood, they

receive a high volume of blood flow regularly. Blood
is rich in many essential nutrients, including oxygen.
Over time, many factors such as smoking, poor
diet, lack of physical activity, and age contribute to
narrowing and hardening of the arteries. The high
blood volume passing through the filtration system
in combination with high blood pressure puts a lot
of pressure on these arteries, further weakening
them. These damaged vessels reduce blood flow to
the kidney’s tissues. They also prevent flow to the
smallest vessels, the nephrons.
Reduced blood flow or elimination of blood flow
altogether means that the tissues are failing to receive
essential nutrients and oxygen, and they lose their
ability to properly function. Therefore, they are no
longer able to efficiently filter blood, fluids, and other
nutrients or regulate hormones—especially those
that are necessary for controlling blood pressure.
When the kidneys are so damaged that they are
no longer able to efficiently regulate blood pressure
in combination with chronic blood pressure, this
leads to dire consequences. Further damages can
occur, and more arteries become blocked, leading to
eventual kidney failure.
So, be aware of your kidneys and appreciate
all that they do for you. Take good care of them by
staying fit, eating well, and being healthy!

 
Why Should You Take Care of
Your Kidneys?
Kidneys are essential for your well-being. It is true
that you can survive with only one viable kidney,
but you want to do everything possible to keep
them both healthy and working. Your kidneys have
several important functions, but their main role is
to filter your blood and remove waste products and
excess fluid from your body and eliminate them
through your urine. While they are filtering out the
waste, they are also reabsorbing many important
nutrients so that your body can reuse them.
Still unconvinced of their importance? Your
kidneys are also responsible for eliminating excess
drugs from your body. They help balance your
body’s fluids by regulating the amount of sodium,
potassium phosphorus, and acid levels in the body.
They also control the production of red blood cells

and produce an active form of vitamin D that helps
control calcium metabolism and promotes strong and
healthy bones. More so, your kidneys release certain
hormones that are responsible for helping regulate
blood pressure.
Keeping your kidneys healthy is extremely
important. If you don’t, they will fail to perform all
the essential aforementioned roles, which will have
debilitating consequences. Unhealthy kidneys lead to
kidney disease and can also cause heart disease and
associated risks such as high blood pressure, stroke,
heart attacks, and death. Kidney disease can also
lead to weakened bones, osteoporosis, anemia, nerve
damage, and complete kidney failure.
Reduce Your Risk of Developing
Kidney Disease
Get Fit
Engage in regular physical activity. Aim for at least 30
minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity five
times a week (or any combination for a total of 150
minutes per week at least every other day in bouts of
at least 10 minutes). Also, include some stretching
and strength training at least three times per week.
A combination of both will improve your heart
health and blood flow and strengthen your bones and
muscles.
Control Your Weight
Maintain a healthy weight with a body-mass index
(BMI) of between 18.5 and 24.9. Monitor your weight
regularly (without obsessing). Don’t weigh yourself
more than once per week, but take note of any
drastic changes. If you notice your weight starting to
slowly creep upward, consider re-evaluating your diet
and physical-activity regime or speak to a registered
dietitian for tips to manage your weight.
Eat a Balanced Diet
Avoid any trendy fad diets, and stick to a regular,
consistent meal plan. Aim for three meals per day with
snacks in between. Avoid going longer than three or
four hours without eating anything. A balanced meal
should consist of half of your plate filled with at least
two different types of colorful vegetables. A quarter
of your plate should be a lean protein choice, such as
fish or chicken, and a quarter of your plate should be
a whole grain like brown rice or quinoa.

Healthy snacks include a carbohydrate or a
vegetable and a protein. Snack ideas such as celery
and a tablespoon of peanut butter or a medium-sized
apple with a small handful of nuts are good options.
Drink in Moderation
Limit your alcohol intake to no more than one glass a
day for women and maximum of two glasses per day
for men.
Don’t Smoke
This should go without saying.
Stay Hydrated
Drink six to eight glasses of water per day. Water is
calorie-free and is your best option. Avoid high-sugar
beverages, as they only add unnecessary calories and
often replace nutrient-dense choices.
Monitor Your Meds
Take all of your medications as prescribed by
your doctor. Also, be cautious when taking some
over-the-counter medications such as aspirin,
naxoproxin, and ibuprofen, which may cause harm
to your kidneys. Always check with your family
doctor.
Stay on Top of Your Health
Know your family history, as this is a good indicator
of any increased risk. Make sure to visit your
family physician annually to keep your health in
check. Your physical should include regular blood
tests to monitor your cholesterol levels and check
your creatinine levels and glomerular-filtration
rate (GFR) for evaluating your kidney function.
You should also check your blood-pressure levels.
Ideally, your blood pressure should be 120/80;
however, as you get older (as long as you don’t have
a history of kidney disease), your blood pressure
should be below 140/90.
As you can see, whether you’re reducing your
risk of developing kidney disease or trying to
manage it, it is vital to make healthy lifestyle
choices.

Dr. Victor Marchione

 

Remember, We Are In This Together!

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Contagious?

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Contagious?

UTI

 

The answer depends upon what microbe is infecting the urinary tract. The urinary tract consists of the urethra, bladder, ureters, and kidneys, each of which can become infected with different microbes. Urinary tract infections usually arise from organisms that are normally present in (colonizing) the person’s gut and/or urethral opening. These organisms (for example, bacteria such as E. coli or Pseudomonas infect the urinary tract by relocating against the flow of urine (retrograde) toward the kidneys.

Lower urinary tract infections do not involve the kidneys while upper urinary tract infections involve the kidneys and are typically more severe. These types of infections of the urinary tract are almost never contagious to other individuals. This article will not consider STDs and the organisms that cause STDs as urinary tract infections as they are discussed in other articles. However, STDs are often contagious and are transferred to others during intercourse, while UTIs are not usually transmitted by intercourse, so UTIs are rarely contagious to a partner. In addition, women who are sexually active and those individuals (males and females) who have anal intercourse have an increased chance to develop a UTI.

It is unlikely for anyone to get a UTI or STD from a toilet seat, as the urethra in males and females typically wouldn’t touch the toilet seat. It is theoretically possible to transfer infectious organisms from a toilet seat to a buttock or thigh cut or sore and then have the organisms spread to the urethra or genitals. Nevertheless, such transmission of UTIs and/or STDs are highly unlikely.

How long before I know I have an infection of the urinary tract?

The incubation period (time of exposure to time symptoms begin) varies with the microbe. In general, common urinary tract infections with colonizing bacteria, like E. coli, varies from about three to eight days.

How are urinary tract infections spread?

Bacterial infections of the urinary tract are almost never spread to others if the infecting organisms originate from the bacteria normally colonizing the individual (for example, E. coli).

 

When should I seek medical care for a urinary tract infection (UTI)?

 

For symptoms of itching and/or burning on urination or discomfort with urination, people should seek help within 24 hours. Individuals who may develop an upper urinary tract infection (kidney involvement with flank pain, for example) should seek medical help immediately.

When are urinary tract infections no longer contagious?

Simple lower and upper urinary tract infections caused by bacteria residing in the patient are not considered to be contagious. Clinicians suggest people are cleared of lower urinary tract infections after about three to seven days of antibiotic treatment and upper urinary tract (kidneys) infections by about 10-14 days after treatment. Some individuals with kidney infection may benefit from an initial IV dose of antibiotics followed by oral antibiotics.

Health and Wellness Associates

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Health and Disease

Habits that can Damage Your Kidneys

creekautumn

10 Common Habits That Seriously Damage Your Kidneys

Our kidneys are super important for our health. They filter our blood, produce hormones, absorb minerals, produce urine, eliminate toxins, and neutralize acids. So as one of the most important organs in your body, your kidneys deserve some love.

Damage or steady decline of your kidneys can often go unnoticed for years as your kidneys can still do their job with as little as 20% of their capacity. Therefore kidney diseases are often referred to as “The Silent Diseases”. That’s why it is so important to take care of them before it is too late.

Here’s a list of 10 common habits that put a lot of pressure on your kidneys and can cause serious damage over time.

  1. Not Drinking Enough Water

Your kidney’s most important function is to filter blood and eliminate toxins and waste materials. When you don’t drink enough plain water during the day toxins and waste material start to accumulate and can cause severe damage to your body.

  1. Too Much Salt In Your Diet

Your body needs salt to work properly, not necessarily sodium. Most people however consume too much sodium, usually from eating out too muchm, which may raise blood pressure and put a lot of stress on the kidneys. As a good rule of thumb, no more than 5 grams of sodium should be eaten on a daily basis.  Look at those labels!

  1. Frequently Delaying The Call Of Nature

Many of us ignore the urge to go because they are too busy or want to avoid public bathrooms. Retaining urine on a regular basis increases urine pressure and can lead to kidney failure, kidney stones, and incontinence. So listen to your body when nature calls.

  1. Kick The Sugar Habit

Scientific studies show that people who consume 2 or more sugary drinks a day are more likely to have protein in their urine. Having protein in your urine is an early sign your kidneys are not doing their job as they should.

  1. Vitamin And Mineral Deficiencies

Eating a clean, whole food diet full of fresh vegetables and fruits is important for your overall health and a good kidney function. Many deficiencies can increase the risk of kidney stones or kidney failure. Vitamin B6 and magnesium, for instance, are super important to reduce the risk of kidney stones.  Never start taking vitamin B6 without consulting your healthcare provider.

An estimated 70 to 80 percent of Americans aren’t getting enough magnesium, so there may be a good chance that you are one of them.

  1. Too Much Animal Protein

Over consumption of protein, especially red meat, increases the metabolic load on your kidneys. So more protein in your diet means your kidneys have to work harder and this can lead to kidney damage or dysfunction over time.

  1. Sleep Deprivation

We have all heard how important it is to get a good night’s rest. Chronic sleep deprivation is linked to many diseases and kidney diseases are also on the list. During the night your body repairs damaged kidney tissue, so give your body the time to heal and repair itself.

  1. Coffee Habit

Just as salt, caffeine can raise blood pressure and put extra stress on your kidneys. Over time excessive consumption of coffee can cause damage to your kidneys.

  1. Painkiller Abuse

Way too many people take painkillers for their small aches and pains, while there are many all-natural, safe remedies available. Excessive use or painkiller abuse can lead to severe damage of liver and kidneys. Stop popping all that ibuprofen and Tylenol in your body, everytime you have an ache, or want to prevent an ache.

  1. Alcohol Consumption

Although there is nothing wrong with enjoying a glass of wine or having a beer once in a while, most of us don’t stop after just one drink. Alcohol is actually a legal toxin that puts a lot of stress on our kidneys and liver.

To stay healthy and avoid kidney issues it is important to eat lots of fresh, whole foods and if you keep the above information in mind and avoid these common habits as much as possible, your kidneys will not be under constant stress and your body will thank you for that.

Do you know what one drink is beneficial to your kidneys?

As always, call for an appt, and we will be happy to guide you through you process of getting healthier, preventing diseases and reversing diseases.

Please share with your family and friends.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

  1. Carrothers

312-972-WELL

Health and Disease

Two Vital Organs can Fail before you Know it

livercartoon

How These Two Vital Organs Can Fail Before You Realize It

Not many people talk about the liver. It isn’t as dazzling as the brain and the heart but between the liver and the kidneys, it’s where 99% of the toxins in your body are safely removed.

Without these two vital organs, the contaminants – caused by air, water, food, and the waste by-product – in your body would overwhelm your system and result in death.

In the USA alone, there are 17,000 cases waiting for a liver transplant.

Did you know…that the Western Diet creates a myriad of problems for your liver and kidneys? One major problem that arises is fatty liver disease, and it plagues roughly 1 in 4 U.S. citizens and 1 in 5 U.K. citizens.

These numbers pale in comparison to those that might not even realize they have fatty liver disease. Unless inflammation is present (which results in long-term damage to the second largest organ in your body) you may not exhibit any symptoms!

This epidemic is preventable and reversible!

In an eye-opening study published in the British medical journal The Lancet in June 2012, it has emerged that people with chronic kidney disease may have the same level of risk for coronary heart disease as people who have previously had a heart attack and similar to or higher than the rate of death among people with diabetes–which is pretty bad!

Put another way, your kidneys can bury you in many ways: not just kidney failure (which is horrible) but by a large increase in the possibility of a sudden fatal heart attack.

It’s really a shame that these two vital organs, the detox centers of your body – get ignored and abused. Not every detox recipe provides the correct ingredients for you! The problem is most health practitioners and doctors don’t have much to say about how to care for these two critical organs. The help usually only appears when it’s time for a transplant.

These 2 vital organs can fail before you know it, so taking care of your liver and kidneys is essential to your life for optimal vitality & wellness.

‘We will be happy to help you through this, and to develop just the correct program for you.

Health and Wellness Associates

847.915.WELL

Health and Disease, Lifestyle

Keeping Your Body Hydrated, is not a Joke!

dehydration

Adverse effects from not drinking enough water include digestive, skin, bladder and kidney problems, fatigue, and even headaches. Type 1 Diabetics know first hand the importance of hydration. We need water as much as the air we breathe in!

Keeping your body hydrated is not a joke.

Did you know that dehydration actually sets in just before you start feeling thirsty? Sipping water throughout the day is the best way to handle it. Always have a bottle or a glass of water handy! If you’re not a morning person, having two glasses of water right after you wake up will boost up your blood pressure to normal levels, and it’s way healthier than having your first coffee on an empty stomach.

Many of us believe that merely drinking fluids like sweetened juices, soda or tea will hydrate you as well as water does. This is not true. It’s actually the opposite! To deal with the excess sugar and salt you are taking in your body wastes immense amounts of precious water just to clean it out from your system. And if you love your coffee, make sure to drink one extra glass of water for every cup you have.

Drinking water regularly speeds up your metabolism and makes you feel more ‘full’. You will eat less once you start drinking more! It’s the safest and healthiest way to lose weight. Drink up!

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article   SDFJ

Call us for assistance in this : 312-972-9353

Foods, Rx to Wellness

Is Splenda Safe? Ask Donald Rumsfeld.

splenda

Splenda or Sucralose

Why not use Splenda? Well, research in animals has shown that sucralose can cause many problems such as:

Shrunken thymus glands (up to 40% shrinkage)

Enlarged liver and kidneys

Atrophy of lymph follicles in the spleen and thymus

Increased cecal weight

Reduced growth rate

Decreased red blood cell count

Hyperplasia of the pelvis

Extension of the pregnancy period

Aborted pregnancy

Decreased fetal body weights and placental weights

Diarrhea

Nearly every month we receive a report from someone who has had an adverse reaction to Splenda, and you can see many of them posted on our site.

James Bowen, M.D., A physician, biochemist, and survivor of aspartame poisoning warns about yet another synthetic sweetener, Splenda.

HAWAII — The chemical sucralose, marketed as “Splenda”, has replaced aspartame as the #1 artificial sweetener in foods and beverages. Aspartame has been forced out by increasing public awareness that it is both a neurotoxin and an underlying cause of chronic illness worldwide. Dr. James Bowen, Researcher and biochemist, reports: “Splenda/sucralose is simply chlorinated sugar; a chlorocarbon. Common chlorocarbons include carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethelene and methylene chloride, all deadly. Chlorine is nature’s Doberman attack dog, a highly excitable, ferocious atomic element employed as a biocide in bleach, disinfectants, insecticide, WWI poison gas and hydrochloric acid. “Sucralose is a molecule of sugar chemically manipulated to surrender three hydroxyl groups (hydrogen + oxygen) and replace them with three chlorine atoms. Natural sugar is a hydrocarbon built around 12 carbon atoms. When turned into Splenda it becomes a chlorocarbon, in the family of Chlorodane, Lindane and DDT, “It is logical to ask why table salt, which also contains chlorine, is safe while Splenda/sucralose is toxic? Because salt isn’t a chlorocarbon. When molecular chemistry binds sodium to chlorine to make salt carbon isn’t included. Sucralose and salt are as different as oil and water. “Unlike sodium chloride, chlorocarbons are never nutritionally compatible with our metabolic processes and are wholly incompatible with normal human metabolic functioning. When chlorine is chemically reacted into carbon-structured organic compounds to make chlorocarbons, the carbon and chlorine atoms bind to each other by mutually sharing electrons in their outer shells. This arrangement adversely affects human metabolism because our mitochondrial and cellular enzyme systems are designed to completely utilize organic molecules containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and other compatible nutritional elements. “By this process chlorocarbons such as sucralose deliver chlorine directly into our cells through normal metabolization. This makes them effective insecticides and preservatives. Preservatives must kill anything alive to prevent bacterial decomposition.” Dr. Bowen believes ingested chlorocarbon damage continues with the formation of other toxins: “Any chlorocarbons not directly excreted from the body intact can cause immense damage to the processes of human metabolism and, eventually, our internal organs. The liver is a detoxification organ which deals with ingested poisons. Chlorocarbons damage the hepatocytes, the liver’s metabolic cells, and destroy them. In test animals Splenda produced swollen livers, as do all chlorocarbon poisons, and also calcified the kidneys of test animals in toxicity studies. The brain and nervous system are highly subject to metabolic toxicities and solvency damages by these chemicals. Their high solvency attacks the human nervous system and many other body systems including genetics and the immune function. Thus, chlorocarbon poisoning can cause cancer, birth defects, and immune system destruction. These are well known effects of Dioxin and PCBs which are known deadly chlorocarbons.” Dr. Bowen continues: “Just like aspartame, which achieved marketplace approval by the Food and Drug Administration when animal studies clearly demonstrated its toxicity, sucralose also failed in clinical trials with animals. Aspartame created brain tumors in rats. Sucralose has been found to shrink thymus glands (the biological seat of immunity) and produce liver inflammation in rats and mice. “In the coming months we can expect to see a river of media hype expounding the virtues of Splenda/sucralose. We should not be fooled again into accepting the safety of a toxic chemical on the blessing of the FDA and saturation advertising. In terms of potential long-term human toxicity we should regard sucralose with its chemical cousin DDT, the insecticide now outlawed because of its horrendous long term toxicities at even minute trace levels in human, avian, and mammalian tissues. “Synthetic chemical sweeteners are generally unsafe for human consumption. This toxin was given the chemical name “sucralose” which is a play on the technical name of natural sugar, sucrose. One is not the other. One is food, the other is toxic; don’t be deceived.” Dr. Bowen also calls attention to another seldom recognized and deadly permanent effect of these chemicals: “Aspartame, sold as NutraSweet, Equal, E951, Canderel, Benevia and under other names, is a hypersensitization agent which causes Polychemical Sensitivity syndrome. Chlorocarbons strongly induce uncurable hypersensitivity diseases which are now becoming rampant.” (James Bowen, M.D.) Doctor Bowen has spent 20 years researching artificial sweeteners after his use of aspartame resulted in being diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease. Dr Bowen’s intention is to warn the world of the toxicity of tabletop poisons like aspartame, Splenda and Neotame.
Dr. Bowen can be seen in the movie “Sweet Misery: A Poisoned World” For the movie call 1 818 349 8822 or email cori@soundandfuryproductions.com See how aspartame was approved by clicking on http://www.soundandfury.tv/pages/Rumsfeld2.html Aspartame and Splenda Toxicity Centers, http://www.holisticmed.com/aspartame Aspartame and brain tumors cases for litigation contact Dr. Betty Martini at Bettym19@mindspring.com or 770 242-2599. Currently taking states New York, New Jersey, Madison County, Illinois and Mississippi A medical text, Aspartame Disease: An Ignored Epidemic by H. J. Roberts, M.D. presents, 1038 pages of aspartame horrors. http://www.sunsentpress.com or 1 800 827 7991 Russell Blaylock, M.D., has published Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills on the subject, http://www.russellblaylockmd.com

Dr. Betty Martini says “the controversy rages over Splenda (sucralose). Is it safe and natural like sugar or is it a chlorinated hydrocarbon? As lawsuits fly, consider the chemistry of this artificial compound.” She adds: “The FDA denied approval of aspartame for 16 years, then caved in to political/economic pressure when Don Rumsfeld, CEO of the manufacturer, was brought to Washington by Ronald Reagan. A new FDA Commissioner was appointed to approve it then became a consultant for NutraSweet’s public relations firm for $1,000/day on a 10 year contract. Forthcoming has been a global epidemic of disability and death. One might expect FDA to be more cautious next time, yet FDA approved the toxic chlorocarbon Splenda without hesitation and without any long term testing on human subjects.”