Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Gluten-Free Cinnamon Lemon Coconut Bliss Balls Recipe

Gluten-Free Cinnamon Lemon Coconut Bliss Balls Recipe

gluten free balls

Word of warning: these cinnamon lemon coconut bliss balls are ever so slightly addictive. But that’s alright because each one has just under 100 calories and only 3 grams of sugar, so you can use your own best judgment on when to indulge.

Want to know the key to keeping the sugar so low? The unusual but delicious pairing of cinnamon and lemon zest. If you love lemon and cinnamon and you’ve never tried this combo before, you’ll be hooked!

In addition to being low in sugar, they’re also a good source of heart-healthy mono and polyunsaturated fats. Plus, they’re super easy to make? The hardest part is zesting the lemon, but you can still be noshing in under 10 minutes flat—perfect when you’re craving a little something sweet!​

Ingredients

  • 2 cups fine almond flour
  • ¼ cup pure maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons almond oil
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, or to taste
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt or table salt
  • ¼ cup shredded unsweetened coconut ​

Preparation

  1. Combine almond flour, maple syrup, almond oil, lemon zest, cinnamon, and salt in a food processor bowl. Process until mixture is well combined and slightly sticky.
  2. Line a large plate or small baking sheet with plastic wrap and divide dough into 20 pieces. Roll each piece into a ball.
  3. Place shredded coconut on a small plate and roll each ball in the coconut, then return to plate or baking sheet. May serve immediately or store covered in refrigerator until ready to eat

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

You may substitute the almond oil for any neutral tasting vegetable oil or liquid coconut oil. Feel free to add additional lemon zest and coconut if desired. Start with recommended amounts, then add more as needed.

Cooking and Serving Tips

You can make a big batch of these and store them in a well-sealed container in the freezer. Enjoy them frozen, or thaw them out a little in the refrigerator before serving. These bliss balls are perfect for dessert or an afternoon treat with a cup of tea.

 

 

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

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Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Natural Insect Repellent that works better than DEET

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lemoneucalyptus

 

 

Natural Insect Repellent that works better than DEET

 

Biting insects can put a damper on your summer fun, not to mention potentially transmit diseases like Lyme disease and West

 

Nile Virus. The majority of US adults (75 percent) said they are actually more concerned about such diseases than they are about potentially dangerous chemicals in insect repellent.1

 

Still, most people also told Consumer Reports that safety is important when choosing an insect repellent, and only one-third believe products on the market are safe for adults (and only 23 percent considered them safe for kids).

 

Concern is well-justified, as DEET(N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide) is used in hundreds of products, in concentrations of up to an astounding 100 percent. DEET has been shown to harm brain and

nervous system function.

 

Children are particularly at risk for subtle neurological changes because their skin more

readily absorbs chemicals in the environment, and chemicals exert more potent effects on their developing nervous systems.

 

DEET is not your only option for insect repellent, fortunately, and Consumer Reports tests have recently revealed natural alternatives that may be even more effective without the harsh side effects.

 

Picaridin and Lemon Eucalyptus Beat DEET for Repelling Insects

 

Consumer Reports recruited volunteers to test out spray-on repellents made of DEET, oil

of lemon eucalyptus, picaridin, a chemical called IR3535, and products made with natural plant oils. After the repellents were applied and allowed to sit for 30 minutes, the volunteers reached into a cage containing (disease-free) mosquitoes or ticks.

 

Two products emerged on top and were able to keep mosquitoes and ticks away for at least

seven hours: products that contained 20 percent picaridin or 30 percent oil of lemon eucalyptus. Picaridin resembles the natural compound piperine, an essential oil in black pepper.

 

However, picaridin is not a natural compound; it’s produced synthetically in the lab. According to the Environmental Working

 

Group (EWG), picaridin does not carry the same neurotoxicity concerns at DEET,

although it has not been tested much over the long term. They report:2

 

“Overall, EWG’s assessment is that Picaridin is a good DEET alternative with many of the same

advantages and without the same disadvantages.”

 

Lemon Eucalyptus Is a ‘Biopesticide’ Repellent

 

Oil of lemon eucalyptus comes from the gum eucalyptus tree, but it is

p-menthane-3,8-diol (PMD), its synthetic version with pesticidal properties,

that is used as an insect repellent. While the term “PMD” is often used

interchangeably with lemon eucalyptus oil, know that it is different from the

“pure” unrefined oil, which is typically used in making fragrances.

 

The pure oil is not registered with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an insect

repellant. PMD or the refined version, on the other hand, has a long history of

use but only recently became important as a commercial repellent.

 

In 2000, the EPA registered oil of lemon eucalyptus or PMD as a “biopesticide repellent,”

meaning it is derived from natural materials. Both lemon eucalyptus oil and picaridin are not actual repellents, but insteadmost likely work by masking the environmental cues that mosquitoes

use to locate their target.

 

Side effects of both picaridin and lemon eucalyptus include potential skin or eye irritation,

and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) states that picaridin should not

be used on children under age 3. Urvashi Rangan, PhD, executive director of

 

Consumer Reports’ Food Safety and Sustainability Center, said:

“They are not side-effect-free, but ‘those problems are much less severe than deet…’ Still,all repellents should be used sparingly and only for the time you need them—especially on children and older people.”

 

Why DEET-Containing Repellents Are Better Off Avoided

 

About 30 percent of Americans use DEET every year, but you should know that this

chemical – though generally effective in keeping away insects – can have deadly

repercussions. From 1961 to 2002, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease

Registry reports eight deaths related to DEET exposure. Three of these resulted from deliberate

ingestion, but five of them occurred following DEET exposure to the skin in adults and children.3 Psychological effects have also been reported including altered mental state, auditory hallucinations, and severe agitation.

 

In children, the most frequently reported symptoms of DEET toxicity reported to poison control centers were lethargy,headaches, tremors, involuntary movements, seizures, and convulsions. Further,

in a study of more than 140 National Park Service employees, 25 percent reported health effects they attributed to DEET, including:4

 

Rashes

Skin or mucous membrane

irritation

Transient numb

Dizziness

Disorientation

Difficulty concentrating

Headache

 

Nausea In addition, Duke University Medical Center pharmacologist Mohamed Abou-Donia spent 30 years researching the effects of pesticides. He discovered that prolonged exposure to DEET can impair cell function in parts of your brain — demonstrated in the lab by death and behavioral changes in rats with frequent or prolonged DEET use. Other potential side effects DEET exposure include:

Memory loss

Headache

Muscle weakness

fatigue

 

Shortness of breath

Muscle and joint pain

 

 

Another potentially harmful chemical found in many bug sprays is permethrin. This

chemical is a member of the synthetic pyrethroid family, all of which are neurotoxins.

 

The EPA has even deemed this chemical carcinogenic, capable of causing lung tumors, liver tumors, immune system problems, and chromosomal abnormalities. Permethrin is also damaging to the

environment, and it is particularly toxic to bees and aquatic life. It should also be noted that permethrin is highly toxic to cats.5

 

Non-Chemical

 

Options to Keep Bugs Away from Your Barbecue

 

Consumer Reports also tested three non-chemical options for keeping pests away from a

simulated backyard barbecue: a citronella candle, a portable diffuser with

essential oils, or an oscillating pedestal fan set at its highest speed.

 

While neither the candle nor the diffuser showed much promise, the fan worked

well, cutting mosquito landings by 45 percent to 65 percent among those sitting

near the fan.

 

Similar results were found from the Consumer Reports survey, which found 45 percent of people who used fans to keep insects away reported them as “especially helpful” (compared to 31 percent of those who used candles).6

 

Naturally, the best way to avoid mosquito bites is to prevent coming into contact with them in

the first place. You can avoid insect bites by staying inside between dusk and dawn, which is when they are most active.

Mosquitoes are also thicker in shrubby areas and near standing water. The American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) recommends the “Three Ds” of protection to prevent mosquito breeding on your

property:7

 

Drain – Mosquitoes require water in which to breed, so carefully drain any and all sources of standing water around your house and yard, including pet bowls, gutters, garbage and recycling bins, spare tires, bird baths, etc.

 

Dress – Wear light colored, loose fitting clothing—long sleeved shirts and long pants, hats, and socks

 

Defend – While the AMCA recommends using commercial repellents, I highly recommend avoiding most chemical repellents for the reasons already discussed; try some of the natural alternatives instead, when necessary

Bat houses are another option since bats are voracious consumers of insects, especially mosquitoes. For more on buying a bat house or constructing one yourself, visit the Organization for Bat Conservation.8 Planting marigolds around your yard also works as a bug repellent because the flowers give off a fragrancethat bugs dislike.

 

Enjoy the Outdoors with These Additional Natural Repellent Options

 

Body temperature and skin chemicals like lactic acid attract mosquitoes, which explains why you’re more likely to be “eaten alive” when you’re sweaty, such as during or after exercise, so trying to stay as cool and dry as you can may help to some degree. Some experts also recommend supplementing with one vitamin B1 tablet a day from April through October, and then adding 100 mg of B1 to a B100 Complex daily during the mosquito season to make you less attractive to mosquitoes. Regularly consuming garlic may also help protect against mosquito bites, as may the following natural insect repellants:

Cinnamon leaf oil

(one study found it was more effective at killing mosquitoes than DEET9)

 

Clear liquid vanilla extract mixed with olive oil. Wash with citronella soap, and then put 100% pure citronella essential oil on your skin. Java Citronella is considered the highest quality citronella on the market

 

Catnip oil (according to one study, this oil is

10 times more effective than DEET10)

 

Another option is to use the safe solution I have formulated to repel mosquitoes, fleas, chiggers, ticks, and other biting insects. It’s a natural insect spray with a combination of citronella, lemongrass oil, peppermint oil, and vanillin, which is a dynamite blend of natural plant extracts. In fact, an independent study showed my bug spray to be more effective than a product containing 100 percent DEET. And it’s safe for you, your children, and your pets.

 

You can also try using lemon eucalyptus oil to make a homemade insect repellent. Here is a recipe from Backpacking Spirit to try out:11

 

“Make your own mosquito repellent consisted of around 10% lemon eucalyptus oil. If you are

using the essential (‘pure’) oil, note that it does not mix with water and will therefore, require a carrier oil, such as hazel, vodka, or olive oil.

 

Procedure:

 

Obtain an appropriately sized bottle for travel; a 100 to 200 ml bottle will be a good

choice. You may also go for a bottle that has a spritzer nozzle for easy application.

 

Choose your carrier oil

 

Use a measuring jug for more precise measurements.  Think 10%

essential oil. If you are using a 100 ml bottle, mix 90 ml of your chosen

liquid and 10 ml of lemon eucalyptus oil. If you are using a 200 ml bottle, mix

180 ml of liquid and 20 ml of essential oil.

 

Shake the bottle thoroughly before use.

 

Spritz onto skin and rub in.”

 

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Switchel Drink Recipe

switchel

Switchel Drink Recipe

Total Time: 25 minutesServes: Makes 2.25 Quarts

 

Have you heard of switchel? This refreshing drink dates back to the 1700s, when farmers enjoyed the drink on the fields as a way to cool down during hot days.

 

Today, switchel is experiencing something of a resurgence as it’s become a popular beverage among the hipster crowd. And there’s a good reason for it: with inflammation-reducing ginger and apple cider vinegar, one of my favorite natural remedies, it’s an easy-to-make drink brimming with healing ingredients.

 

It doesn’t matter what time of year it is — switchel is delicious any season.

 

INGREDIENTS:

 

1 cup ginger, chopped

¾ cup maple syrup (or raw honey)

½ cup apple cider vinegar

⅔ cup lemon juice

5½-6 cups water

DIRECTIONS:

 

Fill a 2-quart saucepan 2/3 with water and add ginger.

Bring water to a boil and allow ginger to boil for about 2 minutes.

Remove from heat and let ginger steep for 20 minutes.

In a 2-quart pitcher, add maple syrup, apple cider vinegar and lemon juice.

Strain ginger as you are pouring into pitcher.

Stir and mix all ingredients well.

Can be served warm or on ice.

*Add more water to dilute if needed.

Please share with family and loved ones

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Homemade Mayonnaise

homemademayonnaise

How To Make Mayonnaise with an Immersion Blender

 

Makes 1 cup

What You Need

Ingredients

2 egg yolks

1 teaspoon lemon juice or vinegar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon dry mustard (optional)

1 cup canola oil, olive oil, or any other oil

 

Equipment

Measuring cups and spoons

Immersion blender

Immersion blender cup or wide-mouth canning jar

 

Instructions

Combine the yolks, lemon juice, salt, and mustard: Combine the yolks, lemon juice, salt, and mustard in the blender cup or canning jar. Pulse with the immersion blender a few times to break up the yolks. You may need to tilt the cup so the blender blade reaches the yolks.

Add 1/2 cup of the oil a little at a time: With the immersion blender running, add the first 1/2 cup of oil a few tablespoons at a time. Make sure each addition of oil is completely blended before adding the next. The mixture should start to thicken and lighten. (Once you’ve made this a few times and have a feel for it, you can try going more quickly, or even try pouring all the oil on top of the eggs and then blending all at once — going slowly at first is just an extra level of insurance.)

Add the remaining oil in a steady stream: Once the first half cup of oil has been added, you can add the rest more quickly. Add as much of the oil as needed to reach the consistency you prefer; the more oil you add, the thicker the mayo will become. You may not need to use all the oil. If the mayo becomes too thick and you’d like to thin it out, blend water, 1 teaspoon at a time, into the mayo until you reach your desired thickness.

Store the mayonnaise: Transfer any mayo not being used immediately to a storage container (or leave it in the canning jar and seal it with a lid). Homemade mayo will keep for about 1 week in the refrigerator.

 

Please share one of your homemade mayonnaise recipes with us.

 

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Foods, Uncategorized

Lemon Chicken

lemonchicken

 

Lemon Chicken Breasts

 

Ingredients

1/4 cup good olive oil

3 tablespoons minced garlic (9 cloves)

1/3 cup dry white wine

1 tablespoon grated lemon zest (2 lemons)

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano

1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme leaves

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

4 boneless chicken breasts, skin on (6 to 8 ounces each)

1 lemon

 

 

Directions

 

Preheat oven to 400

 

Warm the olive oil in a small saucepan over medium-low heat, add the garlic, and cook for just 1 minute but don’t allow the garlic to turn brown. Off the heat, add the white wine, lemon zest, lemon juice, oregano, thyme, and 1 teaspoon salt and pour into a 9 by 12-inch baking dish.

 

Pat the chicken breasts dry and place them skin side up over the sauce. Brush the chicken breasts with olive oil and sprinkle them liberally with salt and pepper. Cut the lemon in 8 wedges and tuck it among the pieces of chicken.

 

Bake for 30 to 40 minutes, depending on the size of the chicken breasts, until the chicken is done and the skin is lightly browned. If the chicken isn’t browned enough, put it under the broiler for 2 minutes. Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil and allow to rest for 10 minutes. Sprinkle with salt and serve hot with the pan juices.

 

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Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Lemon Balm Tea

lemonbalmtea

Lemon Balm

Lemon balm tea has been called the “Elixir of Life” due to its incredible anti-viral, anti-bacterial, digestive, and sedative properties. Incredibly, it also has high levels of antioxidants which substantially increases its ability to heal and work effectively. Lemon Balm contains a compound called terpene which has the ability to help relieve anxiety, stress, hypertension, depression, high blood pressure, muscle spasms, heart palpitations, tension headaches, circulatory issues, and cognitive disorders such as Attention Deficit Disorder and Alzheimer’s Disease. 
Lemon Balm also benefits chronic gastrointestinal disorders including indigestion, IBS, colitis, and acid reflux. Lemon Balm has the ability to promote a healthy, balanced immune system and endocrine system, which is highly beneficial for autoimmune disorders such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Adrenal Fatigue, Multiple Sclerosis, and Vertigo. It is also useful in treating insomnia, sleep disturbances, and jittery nerves, allowing for a more relaxed body and better quality sleep. 
The polyphenol tannins contained in Lemon Balm give it its anti-viral properties making it particularly helpful in healing colds, flu, bronchitis and any viral infections. Topically, Lemon Balm can be applied as a cream to help heal and provide relief for cold sores and shingles as well as cuts and wounds. Essentially, Lemon Balm is a heal-all herb and has rightfully earned its reputation as the “Elixir of Life”. 
As a delicious and refreshing drink, Lemon Balm tea can be added to your weekly health regime for a wide range of healing benefits. Fresh or dried herb can be steeped in hot water for a minimum of ten minutes and sweetened with raw honey, if desired.
Feel Free to share with family and loved ones, and always call us with your healthcare needs.
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