Blog Archives

Pancreatic Cancer Symptoms and Signs

pancreaticcancer

Pancreatic Cancer Symptoms & Signs

 

Pancreatic Cancer typically does not cause symptoms until it has grown, so it is most frequently diagnosed in advanced stages rather than early in the course of the disease. In some cases, jaundice (a yellowish discoloration of the skin and whites of the eyes) without pain can be an early sign of pancreatic cancer. Other symptoms and signs that can occur with more advanced disease are

 

nausea,

vomiting,

weight loss,

itching skin, and

decreased or loss of appetite.

Pale stools, upper abdominal pain that radiates to the back, back pain, abdominal pain, dark urine, abdominal bloating, diarrhea, and enlarged lymph nodes in the neck can be present as well. In some cases, a new onset of diabetes may be a sign of pancreatic cancer, but the vast majority of cases of diabetes are not related to cancer.

 

Causes of pancreatic cancer

 

The exact cause of pancreatic cancer is generally unknown.

 

Rarely, there can be familial or hereditary genetic syndromes that run in families and put individuals at higher risk, such as mutations of the genes BRCA-2 and, to a lesser extent, BRCA-1.

 

Other causes are actually various modes of medication used for diabetes.   Canagliflozin(Invokana), Dapagliflozin (Farxiga) and Empagliflozin (Jardiance) are three medications that were released to the public without a correct length of time to study them, and they are showing to have some positive results for inducing pancreatic cancer.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr J Jaranson

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

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Frequent Nut Comsumption can Help to Prevent Diabetes and Stabilize Glucose levels.

pistachio.jpg

Frequent Nut Consumption Can Help to Prevent Diabetes and Improve Blood Glucose Control

 

This year, the WHO, ( World Health Organization) is focusing on diabetes in order to increase awareness about its rise and staggering burden and consequences, in particular in low-and middle-income countries. The International Nut & Dried Fruit Council (INC) wants to raise awareness about the importance of nuts in the treatment and prevention of this disease.

 

Cyril Kendall, PhD at the department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, explains that this increase of prevalence is linked to our changing lifestyle. “We are becoming less active and our diet is becoming overly processed. This unhealthy diet not only increases blood glucose levels but it also leads to an increase in body weight which further increases the risk of developing diabetes”. Kendall, who has been studying the relation of nut consumption and diabetes, says that “based on the current scientific evidence, nuts may play an important role in improving the risk factors for this disease. Population studies have shown that frequent nut consumption is inversely associated to diabetes development and clinical studies indicate that nuts can help to improve blood glucose control in diabetes”.

 

In fact, nut consumption has been associated with beneficial effects on glucose and insulin levels, according to the latest studies about the relationship between nut intake and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The PREDIMED study concluded that the results of two Mediterranean Diet groups which added extra virgin olive oil and nuts reduced the risk to suffer diabetes by 52%. In addition, researchers at the Human Nutrition Unit, from Rovira i Virgili University, have proven that the intake of two ounces (57 g) of pistachios per day has a significant effect: it decreases fasting glucose, and favors insulin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Also, researchers at the Shih-Chien University and the Chang Gung University of Science and Tech (Taiwan), have shown that 60 g/day almond consumption improved glycemic control in patients with T2D.

 

Currently, about 400 million people (more than 5% of the world’s population) have T2D. It is estimated that by 2035 there will be almost 600 million people living with T2D and almost 900 million people with pre-diabetes, a silent state associated with a high risk of several deadly conditions including T2D, heart disease, hypertension, strokes and early death.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr Anne Sullivan

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

 

Common Painkiller Increase Risk of Heart Attack

commonheartattack

Common Painkillers Boost Heart Attack Risks

 

Common prescription and over-the-counter painkillers, including ibuprofen, boost the risk of heart attack, according to new research that backs earlier findings linking such drugs to cardiac hazards.

 

The study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), finds that higher risk of heart attack depends on dose and arises as early as the first week of use.

But the researchers said the new findings indicate doctors and patients should more carefully weigh the risks and benefits of so-called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Such medications include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cambia), celecoxib (Celebrex), and naproxen (Midol, Aleve).

 

Asprin, which is also an NSAID, was not among the painkillers linked to heart attacks and has consistently been shown to help prevent cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer.

“Given that the onset of risk of acute myocardial infarction [heart attack] occurred in the first week and appeared greatest in the first month of treatment with higher doses, prescribers should consider weighing the risks and benefits of NSAIDs before instituting treatment, particularly for higher doses,” the researchers concluded.

 

 

The findings are based on an analysis of studies by an international team of researchers led by Michèle Bally of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM), formerly an epidemiology doctoral student at McGill University in Canada.

The researchers examined the medical records of nearly 447,000 people, more than 61,000 of whom had a heart attack, from Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom.

 

The findings showed that taking any dose of NSAIDs for one week, one month, or more than a month was associated with an increased risk of heart attack.

Overall the increased risk of a heart attack was between 20 percent and 50 percent greater for those using NSAIDs than those not taking them.

The findings also indicated the higher the dose or frequency of taking the drugs, the greater the risk of heart attack.

 

The study is the largest investigation of its kind to examine real-world patient experiences.

 

After previous studies reached similar conclusions, the Food and Drug Administration required cardiovascular risk warnings be added to the labels of all NSAIDs (except aspirin) in 2005, updated those requirements in 2015.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived 2017

Nick Tate

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Acetaminophen and Asthma

acetaandasthma

Acetaminophen and Asthma

 

As the title says, there is a link between Acetaminophen and Asthma.  Read on to find out about Acetaminophen and ADHD, cancer in boys, and should you give your children acetaminophen when vaccinated.

 

Acetaminophen (brand name Tylenol) is one of the most widely used pain relievers, including among pregnant women.

 

Research published in the journal American Family Physician even called acetaminophen “the pain reliever of choice during pregnancy,”1 and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data suggest 65 percent of pregnant women use the drug.2

 

Acetaminophen was most commonly used to treat pain, fever and flu symptoms among pregnant women in a recent study led by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo.3

 

However, it’s generally best to avoid any medications during pregnancy, including acetaminophen, unless they’re absolutely necessary.

 

When used during pregnancy, even this “safe” over-the-counter (OTC) drug, researchers found, may be associated with an increased risk of asthma in children.

 

Prenatal Acetaminophen Exposure Linked to Asthma

 

Researchers analyzed data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, which includes 114,500 mother/child pairs. Both prenatal acetaminophen exposure and use of acetaminophen during infancy were associated with an increased risk of asthma at ages 3 and 7.

 

Children whose mothers had used acetaminophen during pregnancy were 13 percent more likely to develop asthma by age 3, and the more acetaminophen used by the mother, the greater the risk became.

 

The study also looked into whether the reasons behind acetaminophen use (pain, fever and flu) could be causing the asthma link, but the association remained even after accounting for these factors.

 

Women who reported using acetaminophen for more than one reason during pregnancy had children with the greatest risk of asthma at age 3.4

 

The researchers did not recommend that pregnant women or infants stop using acetaminophen, even though past research has also suggested an asthma connection.

 

For instance research published in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety in February 2016 also found acetaminophen use during pregnancy was associated with a modest increased risk for offspring asthma.5

 

Are Pain Relievers Safe During Pregnancy?

 

The findings raise questions about whether this widely-used OTC medicine is actually as safe during pregnancy as women are being told.

 

Due to recent reports questioning the safety of prescription and OTC medicines when used during pregnancy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently looked into the issue.6 They looked into data regarding three widely used types of pain medications and potential associated side effects:

 

Prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the risk of miscarriage

Opioids and the potential risk of birth defects of the brain, spine or spinal cord

Acetaminophen and the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

The FDA ruled that available data “prevented us from drawing reliable conclusions,” and they decided to keep their recommendations on how pain medicines are used during pregnancy the same at this time. However, it’s best to err on the side of caution when possible.

 

Acetaminophen Use During Pregnancy Linked to ADHD in Children

 

The potential link between prenatal acetaminophen exposure and ADHD came to light in 2014 after a study was published in JAMA Pediatrics.7

 

It included data from more than 64,000 mothers and children in the Danish National Birth Cohort. Over 50 percent of the women reported taking acetaminophen while pregnant, which was found to be linked to:

 

A 30 percent increased risk for ADHD in the child during the first seven years of life

A 37 percent increased risk of being diagnosed with hyperkinetic disorder (HKD), a severe form of ADHD

Behavioral effects appeared to be dose dependent. The more frequent the use of acetaminophen during pregnancy, the higher the offspring’s chances of being diagnosed with ADHD-related problems.

 

Children of women who used the drug for 20 or more weeks during pregnancy had nearly double the risk of getting an HKD diagnosis. They also had a 50 percent greater chance of being prescribed an ADHD medication.

 

The researchers noted that “[research data suggest that acetaminophen is a hormone disruptor, and abnormal hormonal exposures in pregnancy may influence fetal brain development.”8 As further reported by Forbes:9

 

“Acetaminophen can cross the placenta, making its way to the fetus and its delicate developing nervous system. The drug is a known endocrine (hormone) disrupter, and has previously been linked to undescended testes in male infants.10

 

Since the maternal hormone environment plays a critical role in the development of the fetus, the authors say that it’s ‘possible that acetaminophen may interrupt brain development by interfering with maternal hormones or via neurotoxicity such as the induction of oxidative stress that can cause neuronal death.'”

 

Prenatal Acetaminophen Exposure May Be Linked to Fertility Problems, Cancer in Boys

 

Along with asthma and ADHD, prenatal acetaminophen exposure appears to cut levels of testosterone in the womb, at least according to a study in mice. The animals were given doses of acetaminophen equivalent to a human dose.

 

While treatment for just one day did not affect testosterone levels, treatment three times a day for seven days did, cutting testosterone levels in the mice nearly in half.11 The finding is concerning, since most common male reproductive disorders are linked to lower testosterone exposure in fetal life.

 

It’s thought that acetaminophen’s interference with the development of the male reproductive system could not only lead to genital birth defects but also to infertility and testicular cancer.12

 

Unlike the U.S. FDA, which has refused to warn pregnant women about potential risks, The Royal College of Midwives suggested pregnant women talk to their health care providers before taking acetaminophen.

 

The Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health said that prolonged use of the drug should be avoided by pregnant women. Carmel Lloyd of the Royal College of Midwives told the Daily Mail:13

 

“Ideally, women should avoid taking medicines when they are pregnant, particularly during the first three months … Minor conditions such as colds or minor aches and pains often do not need treating with medicines.”

 

While the mouse study suggested only male fertility may be affected, a separate study published in Scientific Reports revealed that acetaminophen (or NSAID) use in pregnancy could also potentially affect fertility of resulting daughters and granddaughters.14

 

Accidental Poisoning Is Another Major Mechanism of Harm

 

Acetaminophen was the medication involved in the most accidental poisonings according to calls to poison control centers across the U.S. related to infants younger than 6 months old.15

 

The drug accounted for 22,000 medication exposures and close to 5,000 general exposures.16 Acetaminophen is often recommended for infants instead of alternatives like ibuprofen.

 

In fact, acetaminophen is the most common pain reliever given to U.S. children, and it’s estimated that more than 11 percent of U.S. children take the drug during any given week.17 In adults, taking just a bit too much can have significant health risks, particularly for your liver.

 

Acetaminophen poisoning is responsible for nearly half of all acute liver failure cases in the U.S.18 Among adults, taking just 25 percent more than the daily recommended dose — the equivalent of just two extra strength pills per day — can cause liver damage after just a couple of weeks of daily use.19

 

Children metabolize acetaminophen differently than adults, and the risks of liver failure from too much acetaminophen are thought to be lower among children than adults.20 However, liver injury has been reported among children given repeated doses.21

 

N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is an antidote for acetaminophen toxicity and is well worth knowing about if you ever use acetaminophen or keep it in your house. NAC is administered as part of standard care in cases of acetaminophen overdose.

 

While I generally do not recommend using acetaminophen-containing drugs for minor aches and pains, they are sometimes necessary to temporarily suppress severe pain, such as post-surgical pain. For those instances, I recommend taking it along with NAC.

 

If you have children and keep acetaminophen in your home, I strongly recommend keeping a bottle of NAC as well in case of accidental overdose. NAC therapy should be initiated within eight hours of an acute overdose for best results. If you suspect an overdose has occurred, seek medical help right away. If this isn’t an option, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the following protocol:22

 

“Oral administration is the preferred route for NAC therapy unless contraindications exist (e.g aspiration, persistent vomiting). The usual recommended loading dose is 140 mg/kg followed in 4 hours by a maintenance dose of 70 mg/kg orally given every 4 hours.

 

This dosing is commonly recommended to be continued for 72 hours; however more recent clinical experience supports tailoring the duration of therapy to the patient’s clinical condition.”

 

Vitamin D-Rich Foods During Pregnancy Decrease Risk of Allergies in Children

 

A higher intake of vitamin-D-rich foods during pregnancy has been linked to a lower risk of allergies in children. The study found for each 100 IUs per day of food-based vitamin D intake during the first and second trimesters (equivalent to the amount of vitamin D in an 8-ounce serving of milk) was associated with about a 20 percent lower risk of developing allergies by school age.23

 

In this case, the use of supplemental vitamin D was not associated with the benefit, although it’s unclear what type of supplemental vitamin D was studied. Other research suggests that vitamin D deficiency may be a primary underlying cause of asthma. Vitamin D will also help to upregulate your immune system, which may explain its potential role in allergies.

 

You can find some vitamin D in mushrooms, fish, eggs and dairy products, and there may be vitamin D in lesser-known food sources as well, like meat. However, when pregnant, you need a vitamin D level above 50 ng/ml to protect yourself and your baby from serious complications, such as premature delivery and preeclampsia.

 

You should have your levels tested and monitored during pregnancy and get appropriate sun exposure and take supplemental vitamin D3, if necessary, to reach optimal levels. I firmly believe optimizing your vitamin D during pregnancy is one of the most important things you can do for the health of your child. When a child is born deficient in vitamin D his or her health can be significantly affected in any number of ways.

 

Research confirms there is a lifelong impact of vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy ranging from not only childhood allergies and asthma but also colds and flu, dental cavities, diabetes, and even strokes and cardiovascular disease in later life.

 

Top Natural Acetaminophen Alternatives

 

Acetaminophen is so common that many people, including pregnant women, have become “blasé” about its use and its potential dangers.24 Before you reach for acetaminophen or any other pain-relieving drug, it makes sense to exhaust more natural options first — particularly for minor or tolerable pain. For instance, the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) works very effectively for relieving pain and can be used safely for pregnant women and children.

 

No matter what your reason for taking acetaminophen, type it into the search box above and you’ll likely find a natural alternative. Even if chronic pain is your problem, the following options provide excellent pain relief without any of the health hazards that acetaminophen and other pain relievers carry. If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, consult with your health care provider before taking any medications, herbs or supplements.

 

Astaxanthin: One of the most effective oil-soluble antioxidants known. It has very potent anti-inflammatory properties and in many cases works far more effectively than many NSAIDs. Higher doses are typically required and one may need 8 mg or more per day to achieve this benefit.

Ginger: This herb is anti-inflammatory and offers pain relief and stomach-settling properties. Fresh ginger works well steeped in boiling water as a tea or grated into vegetable juice.

Curcumin: Curcumin is the primary therapeutic compound identified in the spice turmeric. In a study of osteoarthritis patients, those who added 200 mg of curcumin a day to their treatment plan had reduced pain and increased mobility.25 In fact, curcumin has been shown to have potent anti-inflammatory activity, as well as demonstrating the ability in four studies to reduce acetaminophen-associated adverse health effects.26

Boswellia: Also known as boswellin or “Indian frankincense,” this herb contains powerful anti-inflammatory properties, which have been prized for thousands of years. This is one of my personal favorites as I have seen it work well with many rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Bromelain: This protein-digesting enzyme, found in pineapples, is a natural anti-inflammatory. It can be taken in supplement form, but eating fresh pineapple may also be helpful.

Cetyl Myristoleate (CMO): This oil, found in fish and dairy butter, acts as a “joint lubricant” and an anti-inflammatory. I have used this for myself to relieve ganglion cysts and a mild annoying carpal tunnel syndrome that pops up when I type too much on non-ergonomic keyboards. I used a topical preparation for this.

Evening Primrose, Black Currant and Borage Oils: These contain the fatty acid gamma linolenic acid (GLA), which is useful for treating arthritic pain.

Cayenne Cream: Also called capsaicin cream, this spice comes from dried hot peppers. It alleviates pain by depleting the body’s supply of substance P, a chemical component of nerve cells that transmits pain signals to your brain.

Therapeutic modalities such as yoga, acupuncture, meditation, hot and cold packs, and even holding hands can also result in astonishing pain relief without any drugs.

 

If you take nothing away from this:  NEVER GIVE TYLENOL TO A CHILD WHO HAS BEEN VACCINATED OR EXPOSED TO ANOTHER CHILD THAT HAS BEEN VACINATED.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived: JM

P Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

 

This Device Can Diagnose 17 Different Diseases with One Breath

na-nose-technion

Na-Nose

New device can diagnose 17 different diseases from a single breath

 

 

Imagine finding out what’s making you feel sick just by breathing. That idea is the goal of a new technology that researchers are saying can detect 17 different diseases just by “smelling” a patient’s breath.

 

The Na-Nose device has been compared to a breathalyzer, and according to a study published in the journal ACS Nano, it can determine whether someone has certain diseases with 86 percent accuracy. Those medical conditions include as varied as certain cancers, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis and kidney disease, among others.

The device can distinguish between the diseases because it picks up on something called volatile organic compounds that the diseases cause to be emitted in a person’s breath. According to the researchers, the 17 conditions all resulted in 13 specific compounds being released, but each with their own pattern.

 

“Each disease has its own unique breath print,” the study says — and that unique signature distinguishes it both from other diseases as well as a healthy subject.

 

Your body emits certain compounds in your breath when you have a disease, whether you know it or not.  This is the same emission that trained dogs can pick up for diabetics or seizures.

 

The Na-Nose

 

The Na-Nose was tested with breath samples from about 1,400 people in various countries and was able to diagnose disease almost nine out of 10 times accurately. Additionally, the presence of one disease’s breath print does not stop the device from detecting an additional disease breath print if it too is present.

Hossam Haick of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, who led the research, explained in a YouTube video from Technion that Na-Nose imitates a human’s or dog’s sense of smell to analyze a patient’s breath. It can determine “whether the patient is healthy or has a disease, and to predict who are the healthy people who have a high risk to get the disease in the future.”

 

He emphasizes one potential benefit of the device: catching diseases earlier. Earlier detection often means a better chance of survival for people with diseases like cancer, and Haick says with lung cancer alone the Na-Nose’s ability of early detection can raise survival rates from 10 percent to 70 percent.

 

The study notes the value of such technology regarding access, saying it is easy to use and repeat tests and has the potential to be made low-cost and “ultra-miniaturized.”

 

Use Breath As a Diagnostic Device

“Breath is an excellent raw material for diagnosis,” Haick told Israeli publication Haaretz. “It is available without the need for invasive and unpleasant procedures, it’s not dangerous, and you can sample it again and again if necessary.”

 

The idea itself of using smell to diagnose disease is not new. Quartz notes that in the last decade researchers have worked on such tests for diseases like tuberculosis or cystic fibrosis — in the case of the latter, a test takes advantage of the fact that patients “produce nearly four times as much acetic acid (the base chemical in vinegar) as healthy people.”

 

Diagnosing an illness could be as simple as breathing into a handheld device. And in ancient times, the study notes, doctors would sniff their patients’ poop in the interest of medical diagnosis.

 

According to Haick, the device has been used on thousands of more patients since the trial, and he would like to see it available on the market soon.

 

He also sees the Na-Nose becoming integrated into everyday life. He says in the Technion video that it could be added to a smartphone and analyze breath as someone talks on the phone, keeping a clinic out of the equation.

 

Even if we feel healthy, “the device has much more sensitivity to feel whatever we don’t feel as healthy people,” Haick says.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

S Dillon

312-972-WELL

Homemade Marshamallows

marshmallows

 

Vegetarian Marshmallows

(from U of Indiana)

This recipe uses agar agar, which is vegetarian, instead of gelatin. If you want to use gelatin, use 4t of gelatin for every 1 t of agar agar (2T for this recipe).

Finally, my boys can have marshmallow treats… and they’re better than store bought! Substitute vanilla with candy oils (peppermint is my favorite) and add food coloring for a nice touch. You can make whatever shapes you want: I like snowflakes for Christmas! They keep for over a week in Tupperware. The longer you have them, the crunchier they get, making them perfect for hot cocoa.

1 1/2 t. agar

1 t. pure vanilla extract

1 1/2 C sugar vegetable-oil cooking spray

2/3 C light corn syrup

1/8 t. salt corn starch

Coat a 12 x 17 inch rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray. Set aside.

Place 1/3 C cold water into bowl of electric mixer. Sprinkle with agar agar. Let mixture soften for 5 minutes.

Place sugar, corn syrup, salt and 1/3 C water in small to medium saucepan (if you use to large of a saucepan, the thermometer will not be covered by mixture). Cover. Bring to a boil. Remove lid. Cook, swirling occasionally until syrup reaches 238 degrees (soft ball stage) (~5 minutes).

With mixer on low speed, whisk agar mixture while slowly adding syrup in a steady stream down the side of the bowl. Gradually increase mixer to high. Beat until mixture is thick, white and has almost tripled in volume (~ 12 minutes). Add vanilla (or other flavoring/food coloring) and beat 30 seconds more.

Pour mixture into baking sheet and smooth with spatula sprayed with cooking oil. Let sit (uncovered) overnight.

Cut out with cookie cutters or cut with kitchen scissors, sprayed with cooking oil. Roll marshmallows in corn starch to keep them from sticking to each other. Store in air tight container, with wax paper between layers.

Happy Holidays

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

 

Please Do Not Use Lysol Products

lysol

Please Don’t Use Lysol!

You may find that a strange thing for a healthcare professional to say, but at this time of the year I need to remind people that if you have babies, small children, animals, that lysol products will do a lot of harm to babies, children, animals, elderly, people with inflammation/ auto-immune, chemotherapy patients, diseases, lupes, RA, MS, and cancer patients. Even if your cancer is in remission it is advisable not to use Lysol products.

Easiest way to explain it; Lysol is meant to kill live cells. Well a live cell or organism on the floor, or in the air, is the same live cells that we are made up of.

It has become the cause of many chronic respiratory problems in your children, cancer patients, puppies, small dogs, and so on.

So, Lysol kills live cells and anything living!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

 

Aspirin Slows Spread of Pancreatic and Colon Cancer.

aspirin

Aspirin Slows Spread of Colon, Pancreatic Cancer

 

The humble aspirin, already a recognized ally in the battle against heart disease, is also a partner in slowing the spread of colon and pancreatic cancer.

Aspirin has already been found to reduce the risk of some gastrointestinal cancers, but scientists didn’t understand the mechanics behind the benefit.

Researchers knew that platelets, the blood cells involved with clotting, promoted spread of cancer by releasing chemicals that spurred the growth of cancerous cells, and by increasing the response of certain proteins that regulate tumor cell development (oncoproteins).

“The current study was designed to determine the effect of inhibition of platelet activation and function by aspirin therapy on colon and pancreatic cancer cell proliferation,” the researchers wrote.

Researchers from Oregon Health and Science University combined platelets with three groups of cancer cells: metastatic colon cancer (cells that have spread outside the colon), nonmetastatic colon cancer (cells growing only within the colon), and nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer cells.

When aspirin was added to the mixture, they found that the platelets were no longer able to stimulate growth and replication in the pancreatic and nonmetastatic colon cancer cells. However, the metastatic colon cancer cells continued to multiply when treated with aspirin

In pancreatic cancer cells, low doses of aspirin stopped the platelets from releasing growth factor and hindered the signaling of the oncoproteins that cause cancer to survive and spread.

Only very high doses — larger than are possible to take orally — were effective in stopping growth in the metastatic colon cells, said the researchers.

The study was published in the American Journal of Physiology — Cell Physiology.

 

Other research has also found that aspirin can be a powerful weapon against cancer.

An article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that patients who used aspirin after being diagnosed with colon cancer had a 29 percent lower risk of dying from cancer than aspirin nonusers. In addition, those who used aspirin for the first time after a diagnosis of colon cancer reduced their risk of colorectal death by 47 percent.

A study from the University of Oxford found that a daily aspirin reduced the risk of developing cancer of any kind by about 25 percent when compared to controls who didn’t take aspirin. After five years, the risk of dying in the group taking aspirin was reduced by 37 percent.

Chinese researchers found that women who took aspirin lowered their risk of developing lung cancer by 50 percent if they’d never smoked — and a whopping 62 percent if they smoked.

 

Please share with family and loved ones.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

NN

312-972-WELL

Statin Drugs Cause Flu Shots to Fail

statindrugscauses

Statin drugs cause flu vaccines to FAIL

Researchers have found that statin drugs suppress the immune response that they say is needed to make vaccines work. By taking statin drugs, you’re nullifying your body’s ability to react to an influenza vaccine, researchers say. (And yes, these researchers totally believe the myth that vaccines work most of the time…) On top of that, you also have all the health risks of statin drugs themselves, which have recently been found to accelerate aging and promote dementia and muscle fatigue.

Not only do statin drugs suppress the effectiveness of vaccines, they also suppress your entire immune system, making you more vulnerable to viral infections such as influenza. Thus, taking statin drugs is much like taking down your immune system defense shields, practically guaranteeing you’ll get sick if exposed!

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

M Adams

P Carrothers

312-972-Well

Loneliness and Breast Cancer Survival

loneliness

Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival

 

Loneliness may impede long-term breast cancer survival; a new study suggests.

 

In the years after treatment, women who don’t have strong social ties are more likely to have their cancer return or die from it than women with friends and a support network, the researchers found.

 

Reviewing data on nearly 10,000 breast cancer patients, the researchers linked isolation with a 40 percent higher risk of cancer recurrence compared to socially connected women.

 

These solitary women also had a 60 percent increased risk of dying from breast cancer and a 70 percent increased risk of dying from any cause, the study found.

 

The results weren’t unexpected, the researchers said.

 

“It is well established that women generally and those with breast cancer with greater social ties have a lower risk of death overall,” said lead researcher Candyce Kroenke. She’s with Kaiser Permanente’s Division of Research in Oakland, Calif.

 

People are social animals, said Kassandra Alcaraz, strategic director for health equity research at the American Cancer Society.

 

“We were not meant to be isolated, so the benefits we get from relationships with others and being part of a community are not surprising,” she said. “We know that social relationships are important to general health and well-being.”

 

Exactly why this is so isn’t entirely clear, Alcaraz said. “Having social ties may provide access to real assistance, like having someone to take you to the doctor or having someone to talk to about your concerns or connecting you with resources that can help you cope with the cancer,” she said.

 

Also, social well-being is correlated with physical well-being, Alcaraz added. Having connections to others helps reduce stress and depression and thus leads to better health outcomes, she said.

 

“We need to think of health in a more expansive way. Social influences can be just as important as other risk factors, such as obesity and smoking,” Alcaraz said.

 

Kroencke and her colleagues agreed, saying doctors should consider a woman’s social supports when making predictions for her recovery.

 

For this study, the researchers looked at a woman’s social connections in the two years after her breast cancer diagnosis to see how having friends, a spouse, relatives or community ties might affect her survival.

 

The report was published online Dec. 12 in the journal Cancer.

 

Data was collected on just over 9,000 women. Over an average follow-up of 11 years, more than 1,400 cancers returned. Also, more than 1,500 women died, nearly 1,000 from breast cancer, the researchers found.

 

The links between social connections and prognosis were strongest among women with earlier stage cancer, the researchers said.

 

Also, specific associations differed by age, race, ethnicity and country, Kroenke said.

 

For example, ties to relatives and friends predicted lower breast cancer deaths for nonwhite women. And marriage predicted lower breast cancer deaths only among older white women.

 

In addition, community ties predicted better outcomes in older white and Asian women.

 

“Our findings demonstrate the generally beneficial influence of women’s social ties on breast cancer outcomes, including recurrence and breast cancer death,” Kroenke said.

 

The results don’t mean that loners are doomed to an early death, nor do they show a direct cause-and-effect relationship between isolation and worse survival.

 

Still, it’s important for doctors and other health care workers to help patients connect with support groups and other programs so they won’t remain socially isolated, Alcaraz said.

 

“Social ties have positive health benefits, and social isolation is detrimental to health,” she said. “And it is not unique to breast cancer or to cancer for that matter.”

 

Please share with family and loved ones.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

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