Health and Disease, Lifestyle

Nail Polish Linked to Paralysis

Nail-Polish-Brands-TPHP

Nail polish users exposed to chemical linked to paralysis, reproductive disorders, study finds

) Most women like to indulge in a nice, relaxing manicure every once in awhile, which doesn’t come as a surprised because, well, let’s face it, who doesn’t enjoy a good neck massage coupled with freshly painted nails?

The nail trend is growing trendier, as American women spent a whopping $768 million on nail polish in 2012, according to WWD.com, a number 32 percent higher than the year prior.

Unfortunately, we’re beginning to learn that what may seem like an innocent pastime poses more risks than we beauty lovers may have bargained for.

A brand new study conducted jointly by Duke University and the Environmental Working Group (EWG) discovered traces of a rather toxic chemical in the bodies of women who had recently painted their nails.

25 percent of polishes containing TPHP didn’t have it listed on their label


Triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), a plasticizer dually used in nail polish and as a flame retardant for furniture, was detected in the urine of every woman who volunteered to participate in the study.

“The study found that when women applied nail polish with TPHP directly to their nails, the levels of a biomarker of that chemical in their urine increased sharply. Technically, the researchers tested the women’s urine for a chemical called diphenyl phosphate or DPHP, which is created when the body metabolizes TPHP.”

Published October 19 in Environment International, the study involved the testing of ten nail polishes, with scientists finding traces of TPHP in eight of them; two of the eight polishes containing TPHP did not have the ingredient listed on their label.

“The results represent compelling evidence that TPHP, a suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical also used in plastics manufacturing and as a fire retardant in foam furniture, enters the human body via nail polish,” says EWG.

TPHP caused paralysis in cats

“These results are troubling because a growing body of scientific data from other studies indicates that TPHP causes endocrine disruption, meaning that it interferes with normal hormone functioning. In animal studies, it has caused reproductive and developmental irregularities. (Some studies use the acronym TPP for this chemical.)”
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,  “Repeated exposure [to TPHP] may cause minor changes in the blood enzymes.” Animal studies found that overexposure to TPHP causes muscle weakness and paralysis.

For example, when TPHP (also a neurotoxin) was injected into cats, it caused delayed paralysis, with two of six cats becoming paralyzed after 16–18 days upon receiving one “intraperitoneal injection” of the chemical at 0.1 to 0.4 g/kg.

Since researchers tested such a small sample size, and not the manufacturers’ entire nail polish product line, they decided not to disclose which brands contained TPHP; however, the Duke team hopes some or all of the manufacturers will update their product labels to disclose the presence of TPHP pending the results of their recent findings.

While researchers didn’t name the culprits by brand, EWG has built an extensive list of cosmetics and the potentially harmful ingredients that they contain, including nail polishes that have TPHP. Some of the top-selling brands containing the endocrine mimicker are featured below.

**On October 20th 2015, Butter London informed EWG that it had removed triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) from its products last year. However, EWG was still able to find nail polish products containing triphenyl phosphate on store shelves in September 2015. If you would like to avoid triphenyl phosphate, please check the label on Butter London products and purchase ones with the newer formulation that do not contain this ingredient.
According to EWG, TPHP is likely added to nail polish to give it more flexibility and durability.

“The concentrations in the eight nail polishes with TPHP ranged from 0.49 percent to 1.68 percent by weight. Clear polishes generally contained more TPHP than colored polishes.”

Attempting to understand how the body absorbs TPHP, researchers asked participants to collect urine samples before and after they applied “a polish that was about 1 percent TPHP by weight.

“When the participants wore gloves and applied polish to synthetic nails, their urinary levels of the metabolite DPHP did not change appreciably. However, when they applied the polish directly to their own nails, the levels of DPHP in their urine increased sharply.”

While nails typically aren’t that permeable, scientists speculate that solvents such as nail polish remover allow toxic ingredients to be absorbed into the body more readily. The network of capillaries surrounding the nail bed may also play a role in chemical intake, reports EWG.

“Two to six hours after they painted their nails, 24 of the 26 volunteers in the study had slightly elevated levels of DPHP in their urine. Ten to 14 hours after polishing their nails, the DPHP levels in all 26 participants had risen by an average of nearly sevenfold, suggesting that more of the TPHP had entered their bodies and been metabolized into DPHP.

“Four volunteers collected urine over 48 hours. For three of the four, their concentrations of DPHP peaked between 10 and 20 hours after painting their nails,” reports EWG.

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Health and Wellness Associates

  1. Wilson

Archived Article

312-972-WELL

Additional sources:

EWG.org

EWG.org

CDC.gov

EWG.org

EcoWatch.com

NaturalNews.com

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Vitamins and Supplements

Argan Oil: Hair and Nails

arganoil

Argan oil is the new miracle cure for hair, and for many reasons. Argan oil is especially great for hair because it is lightweight and full of nutrients, such as Vitamin E, D, and A. It is also full of nutrients such as carotene and squalene, which are great for healthy hair and skin. Because this healthful oil is absorbed easily by the hair, it can help address issues such as dry scalp, fragile hair, thinning hair, and damaged hair. Read on to learn about how great argan oil actually is and learn your own recipe for making it at home.

Hair Conditioner

Argan Oil is successful in treating and repairing split ends, as well as smoothing frizzy, out-of-control hair. You can add argan oil to your shampoo, conditioner, or leave-in conditioner. Or, simply apply a small amount (about a pea size) to wet or damp hair and run it through with your fingers, focusing on the ends.

Hair Styling

Thanks to its smoothing abilities, argan oil is a necessary tool in your styling arsenal. It adds a nice healthy shine to your hair without weighing it down or making it look greasy. If ends are looking extra-dry or frayed, simply apply a small amount, using your fingertips, to the ends to smooth them out and help the healing process.

Healthy Skin

Just as it moisturizes your hair, argan oil can moisturize your skin. Thanks especially to its vitamin E and fatty acids, it is a nutrient-rich, moisture-dense solution to dry skin. You can simply add a small amount to your body lotion or your warm bath. You can also use it on your face for a non-greasy moisturizer. Argan oil can help treat skin ailments such as acne, eczema, itchy scalp, and signs of aging, simply because of its rich moisturizing and nutritional benefits. The oil is also safe to use on dry, chapped lips for a fast-acting lip moisturizer and plumper.

Hand, Foot, and Nail Health

Just as it can moisturize your hair and skin, liquid gold is also great for moisturizing and supporting the health of your nails, and addressing rough patches on your hands, and feet. This oil can work miracles for dry, cracked hands or rough, calloused heels. Massage a few drops of the oil onto your trouble spots and on your cuticles each night for skin and nail health.

So now that you’re ready to start using argan oil as much as possible, here is a quick and easy recipe you can make at home so that you can enjoy the benefits of this miracle oil.

Ingredients:

  • Pure argan oil, 100 ml
  • Rosemary essential oil, 4-5 drops

Recipe

Simply add the 4-5 drops of rosemary essentiall oil to a 100 ml container of pure argan oil.

Application

Take a few drops of your mixture into your palm and run it between your hands and fingertips; apply to your hair, starting from your scalp and running it all the way through the ends. You can also just spot-treat dry ends by applying a bit more oil to just the ends. The Rosemary essential oil will help increase argan oil’s benefits for dry, dull hair and an itchy scalp.

Argan oil is one of the few oils that can be used in an undiluted form, which is why the above recipe is so simple. You don’t need to dilute it with another oil, and it doesn’t even need to be added to your lotion or conditioner (although mixing it in with something that is a bit thicker will stretch the number of uses from one bottle).

As with any new oil that you start using, apply it to a small section of skin first to make sure you don’t have a reaction. When the coast is clear, invest in a good amount of argan oil, and start using it on a daily basis for healthier hair, skin, and nail.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

  1. Brown
  2. Carrothers

312-972-WELL