Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Why are You Still Drinking Juice and Giving it To Your Children?

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS – Telehealth

 

orangejuicekid

Quick: think back to childhood (if you’ve reached the scary clown you’ve gone too far). What did your parents or guardians give you to keep you quiet? If you’re anything like most parents, it was juice. But here’s the thing: juice is bad for you.

 

According to pediatric professors Erika R. Cheng, Lauren G. Fiechtner and Aaron E. Carroll, writing in The New York Times, a 12oz glass of orange juice has about 10 teaspoons of sugar, the same amount as a can of full-calorie soda. That alone should be enough to scare off a parent, but the immediate reaction is often, “Yeah, but at least fruit juice has vitamins in it.” This is true: the same 12oz glass of orange juice has 170mg of vitamin C… but your daily requirements max out at 90mg for men and 75mg for women, the rest is excreted as urine. So, sure, yeah, we’ll accept the fact that juice has vitamins in it. But so does a hamburger and so does Nyquil, and I can assure you that a night with those two is much more of a party than a glass of juice.

So what you’re left with after hitting your vitamin needs is a ton of sugar. With juice, you’re consuming all the sugar and none of the fiber, so while you may be having a fruit basket’s worth of fruit in your juice drink you’re skipping over the good part—the fiber—of the fruit entirely and just mainlining the sugar straight into your bloodstream. And all this sugar in the blood (albeit naturally occurring sugar) leads to obesity. 18.4% of American children are overweight, and juice is likely an often unthought-of culprit in the fight against obesity.

 

Is juice the nicotine of the kindergarten class? Are we raising a generation of juiceheads, unable to get through the morning without a sweet sip of the literally-sticky-icky? The results are clear. From Parenting.com:

 

The body responds by producing a large amount of insulin, a hormone that sweeps sugar out of the blood and into body cells. Blood-sugar levels may then drop so quickly, your child may feel shaky or sluggish. Not surprisingly, low blood-sugar levels can trigger a craving for more sweets, which creates a vicious cycle of sugar highs and lows.

Sugar like drugs is highly addictive!

 

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Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Uncategorized

Vanilla Orange Protein Pancakes

vanillaorange

Vanilla Orange Protein Pancakes
What you’ll need:
1 medium ripe banana
1/4 cup vanilla whey protein powder
1 Tbsp coconut flour
1/2 cup egg whites
1 Tbsp almond butter
1 Tbsp orange zest
1/2 tsp baking soda
Coconut oil
1 orange
2 Tbsp slivered almonds

How to make it:
1. In a blender or food processor, combine all the ingredients. Add 1 Tbspcoconut oil to a non-stick pan over medium-high heat.
2. Ladle batter into 3-inch pancakes and immediately lower the heat to medium. Cook until bubbles appear on the surface of the pancakes, about 1 minute. Flip and cook until golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Repeat with additional coconut oil and batter, if needed. Serve with sliced oranges and slivered almonds. Makes 1 serving.

533 calories, 46g protein, 55g carbs (12g fiber), 19g fat

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Recipe

Anna Sward

312-972-WELL

Foods, Uncategorized

Chocolate Bark

chocolatebark

Chocolate Avocado Bark Recipe with Orange Zest and Almonds

 

 

Ingredients

3 cup chips (6 oz package) – chocolate chips, semisweet

1 medium – avocado

1 tablespoon – orange zest

1 tablespoon – orange juice

1 teaspoon – honey

 

Toppings:

1 tablespoon – almonds, sliced

1 tablespoon – coconut flakes

1 tablespoon – orange zest

1/4 teaspoon – sea salt

 

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place almonds on a roasting pan or cooking sheet and toast for 3 minutes, until lightly browned then remove from oven to cool.

While the almonds are cooling, melt the chocolate chips over a double-boiler. Once they are melted completely, stir in the avocado, orange zest, orange juice, and honey (or maple syrup). Mix thoroughly and stir constantly.

Pour the mixture onto a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Use a spoon to flatten and level the mixture. Sprinkle the toasted almonds, coconut shreds, additional orange zest, and sea salt over the top, pressing everything down gently with your hand or the back of a spoon.

Cool for one hour in the refrigerator then, break it apart into pieces and enjoy!

 

Please share with family and friends.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL