Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Red Meat Raises Bowel Problems for Men

redmeatmen

Red Meat Raises Bowel Problems for Men

 

A new study suggests that men who eat lots of red meat are much more likely to have bowel problems, pain and nausea than their peers who stick mainly with chicken or fish.

 

Researchers examined more than two decades of data on more than 46,000 men and found frequent red meat eaters were 58 percent more likely to be diagnosed with diverticulitis, a common bowel condition that occurs when small pockets or bulges lining the intestines become inflamed.

 

“Previous studies have shown that a high fiber diet is associated with a lower risk of diverticulitis, however, the role of other dietary factors in influencing risk of diverticulitis was not well studied,” said senior study author Andrew Chan, a researcher at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

“Our result show that diets high in red meat may be associated with a higher risk of diverticulitis,” Chan added by email.

 

Diverticulitis is common, resulting in more than 200,000 hospitalizations a year in the U.S. at a cost of more than $2 billion, Chan and colleagues note in the journal Gut.

 

New cases are on the rise, and the exact causes are unknown, although the condition has been linked to smoking, obesity and the use of certain nonprescription painkillers known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

 

While diverticulitis can often be treated with a liquid or low-fiber diet, severe cases may require hospitalization and surgery to fix complications like perforations in the gut wall.

 

Researchers examined data collected on men who were aged 40 to 75 when they joined the study between 1986 and 2012. Every four years men were asked how often, on average, they ate red meat, poultry and fish over the preceding year.

 

 

They were given nine options, ranging from ‘never’ or ‘less than once a month,’ to ‘six or more times a day.’

 

During the study period, 764 men developed diverticulitis.

 

Men who ate the most red meat were also more likely to smoke, more likely to regularly take NSAIDs, and less likely to eat foods with fiber or get intense exercise.

 

By contrast, men who ate more chicken and fish were less likely to smoke or take NSAIDs and more likely to get vigorous exercise.

 

After accounting for these other factors that can influence the risk of diverticulitis, red meat was still associated with higher odds of developing the bowel disorder.

 

Each daily serving of red meat was associated with an 18 percent increased risk, the study found.

 

Unprocessed meats like beef, pork and lamb were associated with a greater risk than processed meats like bacon or sausage.

 

It’s possible the higher cooking temperatures typically used to prepare unprocessed meats may influence the composition of bacteria in the gut or inflammatory activity, though the exact reason for the increased risk tied to these foods is unknown, the researchers note.

 

Swapping one daily serving of red meat for chicken or fish was associated with a 20 percent reduction in the risk of this bowel disorder, the study also found.

 

The study is observational, and doesn’t prove red meat causes diverticulitis.

 

Other limitations of the study include its reliance on men to accurately recall and report how much meat they ate and the possibility that the results may not apply to women, the authors point out.

 

Even so, the findings should offer yet another reason to consider cutting back on red meat, said Samantha Heller, a nutritionist at New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City who wasn’t involved in the study.

 

Diets high in red and processed meats have been linked with increased risks of inflammatory bowel diseases, so the link found in this study “is not surprising,” Heller said by email.

 

“Focusing on a more plant based, higher fiber diet that includes legumes, whole grains, nuts, vegetables and fruits, replete with appropriate fluid intake, may go a long way in helping reduce of inflammatory bowel diseases, diverticulitis, and other chronic diseases,” Heller added.

 

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Dr P Carrothers

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Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Diverticulitis: Prevention and Treatment

diverticulitis

Diverticulitis Prevention: Can You Avoid This Illness?

 

The best strategy to prevent diverticulitis is to consume a diet with high amounts of fiber. Adequate amounts of fiber in your stool can help prevent constipation, allowing waste to move easily and preventing you from putting pressure on the colon during bowel movements.

 

Dietary fiber also fuels beneficial bacteria to produce compounds that help regulate your immune function.There are two kinds of fiber in foods, namely soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and forms a gel-like material that makes stools softer and larger, so they can be passed easily through the intestine.

 

Meanwhile, insoluble fiber absorbs water and adds bulk to stool, which helps move waste through the digestive system. You can get both soluble and insoluble fiber from plant-based foods. To ensure that you’re getting equal amounts of both, you should add a wide variety of fiber-rich foods in your meals.

 

For example you can take organic psyllium. It contains both soluble and insoluble fiber and not only promotes healthy digestion, but also heart health, weight control, blood sugar support, and more.

 

Just three servings of psyllium per day can give you as much as 18 grams of dietary fiber, bringing you closer to the recommended minimum of 50 grams per 1,000 calories consumed.

 

Have a health professional go over your vitamins and supplement intake first before you add anything to it.  Taking psyllium along with other supplements can cause you must distress.

 

Physicians have previously recommended diverticulitis patients to avoid eating nuts, seeds, and popcorn, as they believe these can get lodged in the pouches and cause or worsen the infection.

 

However, modern research1 found that there’s no evidence linking these foods with diverticular disease, and therefore may be safe to eat.2 Other ways to help prevent diverticulitis – or diverticular disease in general – include:3

 

  • Avoid overconsumption of red meat.

 

  • Avoid foods loaded with unhealthy fats, as they may lead to intestinal blockage and worsen diverticulitis symptoms.

 

  • Get enough regular exercise.

 

  • Drink plenty of liquids, ideally pure clear water. This is especially important if you are consuming a high-fiber diet. Without enough fluids, the fiber will only add bulk to the stool and will not soften it, which may lead to constipation.

 

  • Maintain a healthy body weight.

 

  • Quit smoking. Smokers have a higher risk of complications from diverticulitis.

 

  • Do not take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), as they have been linked to diverticular bleeding.

 

  • Reduce your caffeine intake. Some people think that drinking coffee can help their stools to pass, but this is actually a wrong approach. Caffeine is a diuretic that can lead you to lose water in your body, causing stools to harden. Excessive caffeine may also cause your colon muscles to contract, preventing stool from passing through smoothly.4

 

  • Do not delay your bowel movements. This can harden stools and increase the strain on your colon muscles, which can then lead to diverticular disease. You should be having three bowel movements per day to keep a healthy colon.

 

 

 

 

Diverticulitis Diet: Foods to Eat and What to Avoid

 

If you have a mild case of diverticulitis, your physician will likely prescribe a specific diet as part of your treatment plan. While it may not completely treat the illness, it can give your digestive system a chance to “rest,” so that it can recover from the infection.

 

Most physicians will recommend that you consume a high-fiber diet. Fiber softens your stools, allowing them to pass through your intestines and colon more quickly and easily. Some of the best fiber-rich foods include:1, 2

 

  • Vegetables (artichokes, Brussels sprouts, carrots, peas, and broccoli) and vegetable juices

 

  • Fruits, including raspberries, blackberries, pears, apples, and avocados

 

  • Potatoes

 

  • Legumes, such as navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, lima beans, and split peas

 

  • Whole grains, such as brown rice, quinoa, and bulgur

 

But in severe diverticulitis cases, switching to a high-fiber diet too soon may not be effective, and may only worsen the symptoms. Instead, your physician will likely recommend a clear liquid diet first.3

 

Liquids You Can Take for Diverticulitis

 

Start by eating homemade bone broth, made from lamb, beef, chicken, or fish, and with some cooked vegetables and meat. This will help heal leaky gut syndrome, boost your immune system, and heal the digestive tract.4

 

Bone broth provides you with easily digestible nutrients, such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon and sulfur. The gelatinous collagen in bone broth also has amazing curative properties. It is a hydrophilic colloid that attracts and holds liquids, including digestive juices, hence supporting proper digestion.

 

Aside from pure and clear water, Ginger tea is another soothing drink that you should add to your diet. Sip on warm ginger tea two to three times daily, as it will help reduce inflammation and aid in digestion. This healing food works wonders on your immune and digestive systems.

 

Other Recommended Foods for Diverticulitis

 

Once your diverticulitis symptoms have lessened, you can move on to consuming easily digestible foods, ideally grated, steamed, and pureed fruits and vegetables. Avoid those that have tough skins and small seeds that may accumulate in the diverticula sacs. Some of the best choices are carrots, beets, grapes, apples, lettuce, and watercress. You can juice them, but leave out the fibrous areas until your body has adjusted to them.

 

When you feel better, you can start to add fiber-rich foods, including raw fruits and vegetables and unrefined grains, such as fermented grains, black rice, quinoa, and sprouted lentils, to your diet.

 

Remember that digestion starts in the mouth, so make it a habit to chew each bite of your food thoroughly, or until it is nearly liquefied. The more you break down the food before it goes to your stomach, the more readily absorbed the nutrients become.5

 

Food plays a great role in how you manage diverticulitis, so remember to discuss your diet needs and restrictions with your physician. Write down your questions, and make sure that you clarify which foods are safe and which ones are not. You can also ask for a referral to a nutrition specialist who can help you come up with a well-balanced meal plan to alleviate your condition.6

 

IF you have any questions or concerns about prevention of this disease or any disease please call us.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

Health and Disease

The Real Facts of Meat and Cancer

redmeatandcancer

The Real Facts On Meat and Cancer

There has been a media attack on meat recently, and the cheers and jeers are rolling in. Vegetarians and vegans are spreading the message in hopes that people will finally realize that eating meat is an unethical and unhealthy thing to do, and Paleo supporters are fighting the news and proclaiming that eating meat is natural and healthy, and in no way causes cancer.
As usual the devil lies in the details and this “not so new” news to those of us who have been studying food and nutrition for decades, requires some serious clarification. Then, you can make a more accurate decision for your chosen lifestyle.
7 steps that makes meat a cancer causing nightmare
The recent spark for the widespread meat debate was generated by the cancer agency of the World Health Organization (WHO), who stated that processed meat is “carcinogenic to humans”. They found that eating 50 grams of processed meat (meat that has been salted, cured, fermented, smoked, or processed in another way) each day raises the risk of colorectal cancer by 18%.
They also went on to say that red meat, which includes beef, lamb, and pork, is “probably carcinogenic to humans”, and has been associated with colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, and prostate cancer.
However, what is not being openly acknowledged in these findings is the way this food is being raised, preserved, and cooked, all which have enormous implications in the end result.
Consider the following series of events, which is very common:
Animal grows up in a CAFO (concentrated animal feeding operation), with other stressed and diseased animals.
Said animal is primarily or entirely fed non-organic, GMO corn and soy products, and sometimes parts of other dead and diseased animals.
As a result of these conditions and to keep animals “healthy”, they are then injected with antibiotics to keep them from becoming “sick”.
To bring the final product to market quicker, animals are injected with steroids and hormones, and are even fed arsenic (chickens) to plump them up.
Said animal then gets brutally slaughtered, and becomes processed and preserved which results in things like cancer causing nitrites being added to many of the cuts of meat.
The end consumer then takes a lot of this meat and covers it with sauces predominantly made up of GM sugar, and cooks it in a way that results in the development of acrylamide, a carcinogenic chemical produced when this meat is cooked at a high temperature (often done in grilling).
This individual then pairs this meat with other starchy, sugary, and grain based foods which results in a terrible food combination that severely compromises the digestive process, and creates more toxicity in the intestinal system through undigested food particles and constipation.
This very predominant process is a perfect set up for any disease, with cancer leading the list. As it seems to be with any food today, it is man’s unabashed capitalistic involvement that has turned it into a disease generating nightmare.
The merits of eating well raised meat
Now that you know why excessive meat consumption that is conventionally raised and processed, can lead to an increased rate of cancer, how about we discuss some of the merits of eating meat, that is properly raised and fed?
Pasture fed animals can result in reduced saturated fat levels while increasing omega-3 content.
Animals with access to a wide spectrum of plant species helps provide antioxidants and less common nutrients like vitamin E.
Grass fed diets favour the growth and activity of beneficial bacteria species, which helps break down protein and fiber.
When vitamin E rich plants are consumed and that antioxidant is stored in the muscle of the animal, it enjoys a longer shelf life and prevents rancid odours and off flavours (without cancer causing preservatives).
Pasture fed or free range animals are less stressed, and more likely to produce healthy muscle tissue (which you end up eating).
Saturated fats contain important nutrients like iron and zinc.
Saturated fats gives cell membranes their necessary integrity, and play a huge part in the health of our bones.
Saturated stearic acid and palmitic acid are optimal foods for the heart, which is why the fat around heart muscle is highly saturated. The heart uses this reserve of fat in times of stress.
A diet high in healthy fats may actually slow the aging process, including stemming off the brain degeneration associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.
So eating meat can have positive health benefits, if it is properly raised and fed, and primarily combined with other nutrient dense and easily assimilated foods, like organic produce.
So can eating meat cause cancer? Yes, if you eat the denatured, processed, and diseased kind, along with other heavily processed and genetically modified foods. However, it can also have a disease preventative effect if it is pasture raised and fed, eaten in smaller portions, and paired with more nutritious and “light” foods.
To really increase your odds of preventing cancer, avoid the factors that are the predominant drivers behind it.
Health and Wellness Associates
Archived
D. Henry
312-972-WELL