Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Gonorrhea

gonorrhea

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are on the rise in the U.S., with gonorrhea being one of the most common. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that gonorrhea is the second most-reported STD, with around 820,000 new cases recorded every year.

What Is Gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea is an STD caused by the bacterial strain Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and it can affect both men and women. Most cases of gonorrhea are asymptomatic (no symptoms develop), but when symptoms  do appear, they often cause great distress. A classic indicator of gonorrhea is the presence of a sticky, pus-like discharge in the penis and the vagina. A burning feeling may be experienced during urination as well. In some cases, pain in the abdomen (or testicles for men) may develop.

Common Misconceptions About Gonorrhea

Due to the prevalence of gonorrhea, many myths have popped up regarding how you can treat or avoid it in the first place, some of which you may have heard before:

Gonorrhea Can’t Be Transmitted Through Oral Sex

The male and female genitals aren’t the only organs that gonorrhea can infect. If a partner has gonorrhea, it can manifest in the throat through oral sex.

Your Body Can Get Rid of Gonorrhea on Its Own

It’s highly unlikely that your immune system alone can fight off gonorrhea, and that you can’t get it again once the infection is gone. You certainly need some form of treatment to experience relief from its symptoms, and there’s a high chance the disease can return.

The Hot Tub Will Kill Off Gonorrhea or Other STD-Causing Microbes

People generally think that gonorrheal bacteria and other STD-causing microbes can be killed by soaking in a tub of warm water. On the contrary, these microorganisms can survive in warm water for long periods of time. In addition, the warm water opens up your pores, making your skin more vulnerable to cuts that can allow the microbes to enter your system.

You Can Immediately Tell if You Have Gonorrhea

Many cases of gonorrhea are actually asymptomatic, making it hard to know who is truly infected. The only way to stop the spread of gonorrhea is to have yourself and your partner tested for STDs regularly.

The Good News: Gonorrhea Is Treatable and Preventable

Conventional treatment for gonorrhea usually involves the use of antibiotics . However, this is not recommended nowadays as the bacteria have evolved and are now resistant to the medication. The CDC states that there is only one class of antibiotic left that may help treat gonorrhea, but chances are this antibiotic will also become ineffective in the long run.

Instead, home remedies can be used to help kill the bacteria. You’ll be surprised to know that simple household items can help treat gonorrhea , such as coconut oil.

Aside from being treatable, you can prevent gonorrhea from happening in the first place by practicing safe sex methods, such as using condoms and limiting your sex partners. Furthermore, this guide will educate you on how gonorrhea spreads, effective preventive methods and possible health complications that may arise if you don’t treat it right away.

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Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Ibuprofen Linked with Male Infertility

maleinfertility

 

Ibuprofen Linked with Male Infertility

 

The widely-used over-the-counter painkiller ibuprofen may pose a threat to male fertility, suggests a small new study.

 

Researchers found that young men who took ibuprofen in doses commonly used by athletes developed a hormonal condition linked to reduced fertility, CNN reported.

 

The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

The study included 31 men, ages 18-35. Fourteen of them took a daily dosage of ibuprofen that many professional and amateur athletes take: 600 milligrams twice a day. This 1200-mg-per-day dose is the maximum limit listed on the labels of generic ibuprofen products, CNN reported.

 

The other 17 men in the study took a placebo.

 

Within 14 days, the men taking the ibuprofen developed the hormonal condition linked with lower fertility. If it does occur in men, this condition typically begins in middle age.

 

While “it is sure” that the hormonal effects in the study participants who used ibuprofen for only a short time are reversible, it’s unknown whether this is true after long-term ibuprofen use, study co-author Bernard Jegou, director of the Institute of Research in Environmental and Occupational Health in France, told CNN.

 

Even though this was a small study and further research is needed, the findings are important because ibuprofen is one of the most widely-used medications, Erma Drobnis, an associate professional practice professor of reproductive medicine and fertility at the University of Missouri, Columbia, told CNN.

 

She was not involved in the study.

 

Jegou agreed that more study is needed to answer a number of questions, including how low doses of ibuprofen affect male hormones and whether long-term effects are reversible, CNN reported.

 

Advil and Motrin are two brand names for ibuprofen.

 

The Consumer Healthcare Products Association is a trade group that represents manufacturers of over-the-counter medications and supplements. The association “supports and encourages continued research and promotes ongoing consumer education to help ensure safe use of OTC medicines,” spokesman Mike Tringale told CNN.

“The safety and efficacy of active ingredients in these products has been well documented and supported by decades of scientific study and real-world use,” he added.

 

Please call us with your concerns about your personal healtcare.

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Health and Disease, Lifestyle

Chronic Pain Can Interfere with Sexuality

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Chronic pain can interfere with sexuality

You and your partner can have a satisfying sexual relationship in spite of your chronic pain.

People need physical and emotional intimacy almost as much as they need food and shelter. Sexuality helps fulfill the vital need for human connection. It’s a natural and healthy part of living, as well as an important aspect of your identity as a person.

However, when chronic pain invades your life, the pleasures of sexuality often disappear. Here’s help on how to reconnect with your sexuality in spite of the chronic pain.

Talk to your doctor

Sometimes pain is the direct cause of sexual problems. You may simply hurt too much to consider having sex. Adjusting your pain medication may be the solution.

If your pain is so severe that sex seems out of the question, talk to your doctor. You may need to adjust the timing of your medication or create a different or stronger pain control plan.

Alternatively, certain medications, particularly pain medications, may cause sexual problems. Some medicines diminish sex drive (libido) or inhibit sexual function by causing changes in your nervous system. Drugs may also affect blood flow and hormones, which are two important factors in sexual response.

Tell your doctor about any medication side effects that seem to be affecting your sexuality. Your doctor may be able to recommend an alternative medication or adjust the dose of your current medication.

Examine your emotions

To have satisfying sex, you need to feel good about yourself. So start by examining your own emotions.

If pain has left you physically scarred, unemployed or unable to contribute to management of your home, your self-esteem could be so battered that you feel you are unattractive and undesirable to your partner.

Awareness that your physical and emotional distance is hurting your partner may add to your anxiety, fear, guilt and resentment.

Stress can also worsen underlying difficulties in your relationship. Even strong relationships can be challenged by medical problems or chronic pain. Being aware of emotional conflict and what’s causing it is an important first step in strengthening your relationship with your partner. Counseling may help.

Talk to your partner

The next step in reclaiming your sexuality is to talk with your partner about your feelings. At first, this may be best accomplished by talking to each other fully clothed, at the kitchen table or in another neutral setting.

Sex can be difficult to talk about. Begin your sentences with, “I,” rather than “you.” For example, “I feel loved and cared about when you hold me close,” is more likely to invite dialogue than, “You never touch me anymore.”

This is the time for both of you to talk about your fears and desires. You may think that your partner has stopped touching you because he or she has lost interest, or finds you undesirable. Instead, your partner may be fearful of causing you more physical pain or discomfort.

Rekindling the spark

Spend time just getting to know each other again. Each of you might do little things that will make the other feel loved. Restoring your emotional intimacy will make it easier to move to the next step of physical intimacy.

Start reconnecting physically with an exploration of each other’s bodies that avoids the genitals entirely (sensate focusing). The goal is not orgasm. Instead, you’re learning more about what feels good to you and to your partner.

Be creative

Sexual intercourse is just one way to satisfy your need for human closeness. Intimacy can be expressed in many different ways.

  • Exploring your partner’s body through touch is an exciting way to express your sexual feelings. This can include holding hands, cuddling, fondling, stroking, massaging and kissing. Touch in any form increases feelings of intimacy.
  • Self-stimulation.Masturbation is a normal and healthy way to fulfill your sexual needs. One partner may use masturbation during mutual sexual activity if the other partner is unable to be very active.
  • Oral sex.It can be an alternative or supplement to traditional intercourse.
  • Different positions.Lie side by side, kneel or sit. Look in your library or bookstore for a guide that describes and illustrates different ways to have intercourse. If you’re embarrassed to get this kind of book locally, try an online book retailer.
  • Vibrators and lubricants.A vibrator can add pleasure without physical exertion. If lack of natural lubrication is a problem, over-the-counter lubricants can prevent pain from vaginal dryness.

Plan ahead

Intimacy can be more satisfying if you plan for it in advance. Make a date with your partner, picking a time of day when you have the most energy and the least pain.

Take your pain medication well in advance so that its effectiveness will peak when you need it. Limit the amount of alcohol you drink and avoid using tobacco in any form. Alcohol and tobacco can impair sexual function.

Give yourself plenty of time to try new things. Try to stay relaxed and keep your sense of humor. Focus on the journey, not the destination. If you encounter setbacks, try not to become discouraged or focus on the negative. Keep trying.

Worth the effort

Intimacy can actually make you feel better. The body’s natural painkillers, called endorphins, are released during touch and sex. And the closeness you feel during lovemaking can help you feel stronger and better able to cope with your chronic pain.

Health and Wellness Associates

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