Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Quitting Smoking Lowers Bladder Cancer Risk

Quitting Smoking Helps Shield Women From Bladder Cancer

 

If you’re an older woman who smokes, quitting may bring a health benefit you haven’t considered: A new study suggests it lowers your risk of bladder cancer.

The largest decline in risk was in the first 10 years after quitting, with a modest but steady decline in following years.

Bladder cancer is fairly rare — about 4.6% of new cancer cases in 2019 — but is the most common type of urinary system cancer. It often recurs and it has a significant death rate, according to study author Dr. Yueyao Li, a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Public Health at Indiana University in Bloomington.

While bladder cancer is more common in men, women often have worse outcomes even when diagnosed at similar stages.

Smoking is a known risk factor, but findings about the link between how long it’s been since a person quit and reduction in bladder cancer risk have been inconsistent.

In this study, Li’s team examined data from about 144,000 participants in the Women’s Health Initiative, a long-term study of postmenopausal women in the U.S.

Of those, 52.7% never smoked; 40.2% were former smokers and 7.1% were current smokers.

As of Feb. 28, 2017, there had been 870 cases of bladder cancer among the women. Compared to those who never smoked, former smokers had twice the risk of bladder cancer and current smokers had more than triple the risk.

Researchers found a 25% reduction in risk among former smokers in the 10 years after they quit, and it continued to fall more slowly after that. But even 30 years after quitting, ex-smokers still had a higher risk of bladder cancer than women who never smoked.

Compared with current smokers, former smokers had a 39% decrease in bladder cancer risk, which continued to fall over time.

The study was recently published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

“Our study emphasizes the importance of primary prevention (by not beginning to smoke) and secondary prevention (through smoking cessation) in the prevention of bladder cancer among postmenopausal women,” Li said in a journal news release.

“Current smokers should be advised to quit smoking in order to reduce the risk of bladder cancer,” she added.

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Dr Anna Killarney

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Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Cutting Down On Drinking Can Help You Quit Smoking

Health and Wellness Associates

 

Cutting Down On Drinking Can Help You Quit Smoking

 

stopsmoking.jpg

 

Research has revealed that heavy drinkers who’re attempting to quit smoking could find that limiting their alcohol consumption could also help them to quit smoking.  The nicotine metabolite ratio of study participants who consumed alcohol heavily reduced as their alcohol consumption was limited. Nicotine metabolite ratio is a biomarker which indicates how fast an individual’s body metabolizes nicotine, and is an index of nicotine metabolism.

Using alcohol together with cigarettes is common, with almost 1 in 5 individuals making use of both. Cigarette smoking is particularly common in heavy drinkers. Alcohol consumption is a proven risk factor for smoking, and smoking is proven risk factor for consuming alcohol. It requires a great deal of determination to quit smoking, usually taking quite a few attempts.

Previous studies have indicated that individuals having higher nicotine metabolism ratios will probably smoke a lot more and that individuals with higher rates have a more difficult time quitting. Slowing an individual’s nicotine metabolism rate by means of reduced alcohol consumption could provide an edge when attempting to quit smoking, which is proven to be a challenging undertaking.

The nicotine metabolite ratio was examined over a few weeks in a group of 22 individuals who smoked daily and had been looking for alcohol use disorder treatment, the medical term used for severe alcohol consumption.

This study indicates that the nicotine metabolism is changed by alcohol consumption as indexed by the nicotine metabolite ratio. The study also suggests that smoking and consuming alcohol on a daily basis should best be treated at the same time.

The nicotine metabolite ratio proved to be clinically useful. Individuals having a higher ratio have a more difficult time giving up smoking cold turkey. They’re also not as likely to successfully stop smoking by making use of nicotine replacement therapy products.

It was discovered that the nicotine metabolite rate of the male study participants decreased as they cut down on their alcohol consumption from an average of 29 drinks per week to 7 drinks per week.

The researchers’ results for men replicated those of previous research which discovered similar effects and provide more proof of the significance of the nicotine metabolite ratio biomarker for advising treatment for smokers attempting to quit.

Although the nicotine metabolite ratio is considered to be an index that is stable, it might not be as stable as previously thought. This is positive from a clinical point of view, because if an individual wants to quit smoking, they should be encouraged to cut down on alcohol consumption to assist with a smoking cessation plan.

The female study participants didn’t see reductions in the nicotine metabolite ratio, but it was found that they didn’t reduce their alcohol consumption very much for the duration of the study period. Their rate of alcohol consumption started low and remained low.

 

Nothing Will Work Unless You Do It!

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Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Smoking Just One Cigarette is Deadly

smoking

Just 1 Cigarette a Day Can Be Deadly: Study

 

Think smoking just one cigarette a day is harmless? Think again, a new study says.

 

Even a single daily cigarette can raise your odds for an early death, the research showed.

 

“There is no safe level of exposure to tobacco smoke,” said study author Maki Inoue-Choi, who’s with the division of cancer epidemiology and genetics at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI).

 

“Smoking cessation benefits all smokers, regardless of how few cigarettes they smoke,” she added in an institute news release.

 

In the study, Inoue-Choi’s team tracked data on more than 290,000 older Americans, aged 59 to 82. The investigators wanted to assess the risks of “light” smoking — defined as 10 or fewer cigarettes a day.

 

All of the smokers were asked about their smoking habits at nine different points in their lives, beginning with before they turned 15 until after they reached the age of 70.

 

Compared with people who’d never smoked, those who smoked an average of less than one cigarette a day over their lifetime still had a 64 percent higher risk of dying early. And those who smoked one to 10 cigarettes a day had an 87 percent higher risk, the findings showed.

 

It’s never too early — or too late — to quit smoking, either. The study showed that the risk of an early death was lower for former light smokers than those who remained light smokers. And the younger they were when they quit, the lower their risk, the NCI team found.

 

The researchers also looked at specific causes of death. Compared with never-smokers, the risk of death from lung cancer was nine times higher among those who smoked less than one cigarette a day over their lifetime, and 12 times higher among those who smoked one to 10 cigarettes a day.

 

In addition, those who smoked one to 10 cigarettes a day were six times more likely to die of respiratory diseases (such as emphysema), and one-and-a-half times more likely to die of heart disease compared with never-smokers.

 

Two doctors who work with smokers as patients weren’t surprised by the findings.

 

“There is simply no safe level of smoking,” said Dr. Len Horovitz, a pulmonary specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “Smoking cessation is imperative, but never starting to smoke is even better.”

 

Patricia Folan directs the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. She said, “My experience with low-intensity smokers is that they often don’t consider themselves ‘real’ smokers. When asked if they smoke, they will often respond that they do not.”

 

These individuals’ smoking habits often remain hidden, Folan said.

 

“Merely asking patients if they smoke may not be sufficient to elicit accurate responses to the question,” she reasoned. “Perhaps a better question would be, ‘When was the last time you smoked?’, thus providing the opportunity for patients to give a more precise answer about whether they smoke at all and how much.”

 

The study was published Dec. 5, 2016  in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

 

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Health and Disease, Lifestyle, Uncategorized

Smoking Damages Your DNA for Decades

smoking-cigarette

 

Smoking Damages Your DNA for Decades

Nearly 40 million adults in the U.S. smoke cigarettes.1 It is the leading cause of preventable death, accounting for 1 out of every 5 deaths in the U.S.2 Although smoking has declined by 4 percent over nine years, sales of e-cigarettes have risen an amazing 143 times from $20 million to $2.875 billion in sales per year.3

 

According to Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 130,000 cases of lung cancer diagnosed each year are attributed to smoking.4 New research now demonstrates damage to your DNA from smoking stays with you for decades.

 

While much of the damage from smoking is healed within the first five years you quit, some DNA damage doesn’t appear to revert to normal.5

 

The increasing sales of e-cigarettes may be from individuals trying to quit smoking, or from those who believe these electronic gizmos are a healthier alternative. Alas, vaping, or smoking electronic cigarettes that produce vapor instead of smoke, has its own list of negative health effects.

 

So, while you may believe e-cigarettes are healthier, you’re really just trading one serious health risk for another.

 

Smoking Affects DNA Methylation

 

Where scientists once thought the genes you were born with were the genes you were stuck with throughout life, now they have identified changes to your DNA, called methylation, that affect how your genes are expressed or may modify the way those genes affect your health.

 

The development of some health conditions are affected by your genetics. In some cases, DNA methylation will tell your genes to turn “off,” effectively changing how your body responds to the environment. DNA methylation is a signaling tool used for gene expression that’s vital to a number of cell process that control human disease.6

 

Although scientists are still working to understand the complexities of how DNA methylation and genetic expression are connected, they have identified this connection in the development of cancer (although, as explained in previous articles, genetic changes that contribute to cancer are typically downstream effects of metabolic dysfunction, not the original cause).7

 

Smoking Changes Your DNA and Increases Your Risk of Disease

 

Researchers have known that smoking alters your DNA methylation, but this recent study demonstrates how long those changes last and how widespread they may be.8

 

Lead researcher Dr. Stephanie London, chief of the Epidemiology Branch at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, told Reuters:9

 

“We don’t really know whether it means ‘damage’ to the DNA. That requires more study, using data outside what we have here. What we’re saying is that it’s a change to your DNA that can have a downstream effect on what genes are expressed at what levels.”

 

However, any change to your DNA by toxic substances may be considered damage. The amount of damage and the consequences for that damage is where researchers will be focusing further study. This study combined data from a set of participants from 16 other studies, using blood samples from over 15,000 people.

 

The team compared the samples from current smokers to former smokers and those who said they had never smoked.10 People who were currently smoking had over 2,500 genetic changes to their DNA.

 

After a smoker quits, much of the DNA changes revert back to their original state, but some remain changed even decades later. The researchers found 185 locations that were significantly different between people who formerly smoked and those who had never smoked.

 

DNA Methylation Affects Development of Cancers and Chronic Diseases

 

Smoking changes your DNA methylation, affecting your gene expression. Researchers have linked these changes in gene expression from methylation to both the development of cancers and the expression of cardiovascular disease.11,12,13,14

 

London, quoted in Medical News Today, expressed her concern over the long-term effects smokers may experience:15

 

“These results are important because methylation, as one of the mechanisms of the regulation of gene expression, affects what genes are turned on, which has implications for the development of smoking-related diseases.

 

Equally important is our finding that even after someone stops smoking, we still see the effects of smoking on their DNA.”

 

DNA methylation is also linked to prenatal cigarette exposure and the development of chronic disease when the child grows to adulthood.16,17

 

Although adverse effects of smoking during pregnancy have been well-documented, most media attention is on preterm birth, low birth weight, brain damage to the baby, birth defects and lung damage.18

 

Only now are other long-term health conditions associated with prenatal or early postnatal exposure to cigarette smoke. Children exposed to smoke have increased risk of behavioral and developmental problems including attention deficit disorder (ADD) and other conduct disorders.19

 

Other studies demonstrate links between prenatal smoking exposure and the development of cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes in adulthood.20 Further studies specifically link nicotine exposure to long term health conditions in children.21

 

You Absorb Nicotine From the Air Through Your Skin

 

Breathing secondhand smoke triggers health conditions much like if you were smoking yourself. Exposure to smoke led researchers to question if the only way your body absorbed nicotine was through inhaling. Could you absorb the chemicals through your skin?

 

Nicotine patches are used to help smokers control their urge to smoke and theoretically help them stop smoking. In this case, the chemical is placed directly against the user’s skin and held in place with a patch. Is it possible to absorb nicotine from the air as well?

 

Findings from a new study demonstrate that your body can absorb nicotine from secondhand smoke or wearing clothes that have been exposed to smoke.22

 

These results are especially important for children and teens who are exposed to smoking or vaping. Charles Weschler, Ph.D., co-author of the study and chemist at Rutgers University, was quoted in Science News for Students, saying:23,24

 

“If you’re in a room where smoking or vaping is occurring, you’re taking in the smoke through your skin as well as your lungs.”

 

Researchers found the dose absorbed by the participants was not trivial and amounted to the same as smoking between 0.5 and six cigarettes. Lead researcher, Gabriel Beko, Ph.D., civil engineer from the Technical University of Denmark, said this was about as much as you could expect to inhale in a smoky room.25

 

This means the amount of smoke you may be absorbing from a smoky room is greater than the chemicals you’re inhaling. Researchers also found that wearing clothing that was exposed to smoke also increases your absorption of nicotine.

 

E-Cigarettes Are Not the Answer

 

 

E-cigarettes deliver a dose of nicotine. In this short video you’ll discover more of the side effects you may experience from nicotine in your cigarettes or e-cigarettes. Studies demonstrate the health dangers in using nicotine, the active ingredient in e-cigarettes. Your risks may be slightly different, but they are no less dangerous than smoking tobacco.

 

Research has determined that individuals who quit smoking for at least three to six months have the greatest chance of stopping smoking permanently.26 While you may feel it’s reasonable to use e-cigarettes to help you stop smoking, the reality is that you continue to remain addicted to nicotine and engage in the same addictive activity.

 

E-cigarettes deliver a dose of nicotine, the drug in cigarettes to which your body is addicted, through an electronic mechanism that doesn’t contain any of the other harmful chemicals found in cigarettes. But while many would like to think the jury is out on whether vaping is harmful for your health, data from several studies published in early 2015 demonstrate otherwise.

 

Nicotine is one of the oldest botanical insecticides,27 and a powerful poison.28  Researchers have linked nicotine to a number of different health conditions.29

 

Doing a Medline and PubMed database search on specific keywords, researchers gathered data from over 3,400 different articles and studies. From the analysis, they found nicotine adversely affects the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and reproductive systems. It promotes the creation of tumors by affecting cell proliferation and increases resistance to chemotherapeutic agents.30

 

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more people in America are addicted to nicotine than any other drug, and it may be as addictive as heroin, cocaine or alcohol.31 The Cleveland Clinic warns that preliminary studies show nicotine does direct damage to your heart cells and vascular cells.32

 

This damage triggers an inflammatory response and may lead to atherosclerosis.33 Meanwhile, it is unclear whether adding nicotine to your body, the drug to which you are addicted, will help you stop smoking, or if e-cigarettes help or just get in your way.34

 

Flavors and Heat Raise the Risk

 

In 2014, the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) took over 3,700 calls of nicotine poisoning in children from e-cigarettes.35 But nicotine is not the only concern if you vape. There are over 7,000 flavoring chemicals for e-cigarettes, designed to enhance the flavor and engage more users.

 

Researchers from Harvard School of Public Health selected 51 of those flavors to evaluate. They found nearly all the flavorings contained chemicals with known negative effects on your health. In a press release from Harvard, lead author Joseph Allen, assistant professor of exposure assessment science, stated:36

 

“Recognition of the hazards associated with inhaling flavoring chemicals started with ‘Popcorn Lung’ over a decade ago. However, diacetyl and other related flavoring chemicals are used in many other flavors beyond butter-flavored popcorn, including fruit flavors, alcohol flavors, and, we learned in our study, candy flavored e-cigarettes.”

 

Co-author David Christiani, also stated:37

 

“Since most of the health concerns about e-cigarettes have focused on nicotine, there is still much we do not know about e-cigarettes. In addition to containing varying levels of the addictive substance nicotine, they also contain other cancer-causing chemicals, such as formaldehyde, and as our study shows, flavoring chemicals that can cause lung damage.”

 

At high voltage, 3 milligrams of e-cigarette liquid can generate 14 milligrams of formaldehyde.38 This is slightly less than you would inhale in five packs of regular cigarettes. In an NCB News interview, co-author James Pankow, Ph.D., and professor of chemistry and engineering at Portland State University, said:39

 

“It’s way too early now from an epidemiological point of view to say how bad they are. But the bottom line is, there are toxins and some are more than in regular cigarettes. And if you are vaping, you probably shouldn’t be using it at a high-voltage setting.”

 

US Food and Drug Administration Fighting the Tobacco Industry

 

According to the CDC, 15 percent of Americans over 18 smoke cigarettes.40 According to Tobacco Free Kids, 12.6 percent have tried e-cigarettes and 3.7 percent use them consistently.41 Although a smaller percentage of the market, the tobacco industry recognizes the economic potential behind e-cigarette sales and has wholeheartedly invested time and money into influencing legislation.

 

Battle lines have been drawn between the tobacco industry and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which wants to retroactively examine e-cigarettes, cigars and pipe and hookah tobacco for public health risks.42 A bipartisan effort of lobbyists and influential congressional allies are arguing the Deeming Rule could hurt public health by ultimately forcing smaller e-cigarette companies out of business.

 

The Deeming Rule, announced in May 2016, is a step the FDA implemented to allow the agency to “protect future generations from the dangers of tobacco use through a variety of steps, including restricting the sale of these tobacco products to minors nationwide.”43

 

Flying in the face of multiple studies that prove otherwise, Chritian Berkey, chief executive of Johnson Creek Enterprises, a company that sells the e-liquid ingredient for vaping products, stated in The New York Times: “The FDA has blatantly ignored evidence that our products improve people’s lives.”44 Defending the FDA’s position against the tobacco industry, Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products was quoted in The New York Times saying:45

 

” . . . [T]he marketplace has been the wild, wild West. Companies were free to introduce any product they wanted, make any claim they wanted, and that is how we wound up with a 900 percent increase in high schoolers using e-cigarettes and as well as all these reports of exploding e-cigarette batteries and products that have caused burns and fires and disfigurement.”

 

Trading Your Health for Profits

 

The largest tobacco company in the U.S., Altria (formerly known as Philip Morris Co.), has been funding the lobbying effort to overturn the FDA rule. With a growing e-cigarette unit, Altria distributed their draft of legislation that would eliminate the Deeming Rule for e-cigarettes already on the market.

 

The New York Times reported that two weeks after delivery of this draft to his office, Representative Tom Cole of Oklahoma introduced the bill with 245 words pulled verbatim from the tobacco industry draft. Cole received one of the highest campaign contributions from the tobacco industry.

 

In an interview with The New York Times, ranking Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee, Nita Lowey of New York, expressed her embarrassment that more than 70 lawmakers were willing to co-sponsor legislation originally drafted by the tobacco industry. She stated:46

 

“For Congress to consider going backward in how we regulate the public health hazard is simply mind-boggling. It wasn’t that long ago that tobacco companies were telling the public that cigarettes were not addictive and denying clear evidence that they caused cancer.”

 

In a letter to the editor at The New York Times, former federal judge Haddon Lee Sarokin republished an opinion he had written 24 years ago, as he believes it is equally valid today, in regard to the e-cigarette industry, as it was back then. At the time, this opinion was heavily criticized by the Senate, causing him to be removed from tobacco cases.

 

“All too often in the choice between the physical health of consumers and the financial well-being of business, concealment is chosen over disclosure, sales over safety and money over morality. Who are these persons who knowingly and secretly decide to put the buying public at risk solely for the purpose of making profits and who believe that illness and death of consumers is an appropriate cost of their own prosperity!”47

 

If You Want to Quit Smoking, Do This First

 

I believe the “secret” to quitting smoking is to get healthy first, which will make quitting much easier. Exercising is part and parcel of this plan, as research shows people who engage in regular strength training double their success rate at quitting smoking compared to those who don’t exercise.48 Healthy eating is another crucial aspect that can’t be ignored. In short, if you want to quit, here are the three basic tips to get you started:

 

Read through my comprehensive free nutrition plan to get started eating right.

Develop a well-rounded exercise regimen. It is your ally to fighting disease and to quitting smoking. Strength training is an important part, but also remember to incorporate high-intensity interval exercises like Peak Fitness, core-strengthening exercises, stretching and regular non-exercise movement (like walking and cutting back on sitting).

Find a healthy emotional outlet. Many people use exercise, meditation or relaxation techniques for this, and these are all great. I also recommend incorporating the Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT). This can help clear out emotional blockages from your system (some of which you might not even realize are there), thus restoring your mind and body’s balance and helping you break the addiction and avoid cravings.

Once you are regularly doing these three things, then you can begin to think about quitting smoking. At this point many are ready to try quitting “cold turkey.” Predict your urge to smoke, and preplan healthier alternatives and distractions. Finally, if you’re a parent, talk with your children about the risks of smoking, smokeless tobacco and e-cigarettes. The easiest pathway to not smoking is to avoid starting in the first place.

 

 

Please share with family and loved ones.

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Health and Disease, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

10 Ways to Treat COPD Naturally

COPD-summertime-triggers

10 Ways to Treat COPD Symptoms Naturally

 

 

Are you familiar with the third leading cause of death in the U.S.? I’m talking about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, more commonly known as COPD. This respiratory disease is characterized by an abnormal inflammatory response in the lungs and restricted airflow, which both result in difficulty doing the most vital thing in life — breathing. And these are just a few COPD symptoms so many people deal with.

 

Important News on COPD.  It has been more than 50 years that the Federal Government has been warning people about COPD from smoking cigarettes.  The Insurance Board has stated that your medical insurance no longer has to pay for your healthcare.  It is a choice you have made, and no one should pay for your poor decision.

 

 

More than 11 million people in this country have already been diagnosed with COPD, but an estimated 24 million may have the disease without even realizing it! (1) COPD is actually an umbrella term that includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis and, in some cases, asthma. The No. 1 reason someone gets COPD in developed countries is smoking tobacco, so the best way to avoid COPD is not to smoke or stop smoking immediately. Sadly, close to half of U.S. adults over the age of 40 who have trouble breathing due to asthma or COPD still continue to smoke. (2)

 

If you’re willing, there are many ways to treat and reduce your risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with your own efforts and natural treatment. But first, you must realize you have COPD symptoms to begin with — then you can pinpoint exactly how to treat them.

 

COPD Symptoms & Life Expectancy

 

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, bronchiectasis and chronic airway obstruction. These diseases are all commonly characterized by irreversible airflow limitation.

 

Symptoms of COPD often don’t appear until significant lung damage has occurred, and they usually worsen over time, particularly if smoking exposure continues. For chronic bronchitis, the main symptom is a daily cough and sputum production at least three months a year for two consecutive years.

 

Signs and symptoms of COPD include:

 

Shortness of breath while doing everyday activities or during physical activities

Chronic cough

Wheezing

Chest tightness

Frequent respiratory infections

Blueness of the lips or fingernail beds

General fatigue and lack of energy or chronic fatigue syndrome

Producing a lot of mucus or phlegm

Having to clear your throat first thing in the morning, due to excess mucus in your lungs

Unintended weight loss (in later stages)

 

People with COPD are likely to experience episodes called exacerbations. This is when symptoms become worse than usual and persist for at least several days. If you have one or more of these symptoms on a regular basis, then you definitely want to seek medical advise. Early detection of COPD is key to successful treatment. A simple test called spirometry can be used to measure pulmonary (lung) function and detect COPD in anyone with breathing problems.

 

There are four stages of COPD:

 

Stage 1 — very mild COPD

Stage 2 — moderate COPD

Stage 3 — severe emphysema/chronic bronchitis

Stage 4 — very severe COPD

Each of these stages has a different impact on each sufferer, but generally speaking the higher the stage of COPD, the shorter the life expectancy. Overall, COPD can cause serious long-term disability and early death. Unfortunately, there is currently no cure for COPD, and the number of people dying from COPD continues to grow. However, there are natural ways to slow its progression.

 

10 Natural Treatments for COPD Symptoms

 

  1. Avoid Smoke in Every Way

 

The most essential step in conventional and natural treatment plan for COPD is the same — stop any and all forms of smoking. Yes, this includes the electronic cigarette. If you smoke, this is the only way to keep COPD from getting worse.

 

In general, you should avoid smoke of any kind. You should also avoid air pollution as much as possible. If you’re not a smoker, then you definitely need to avoid places where others smoke. Smoking yourself is definitely the worst thing you can do when it comes to COPD, but secondhand smoke and air pollution can damage and irritate your lungs too. (3)

 

  1. 2. Improve Your Breathing

 

There are techniques for breathing that can help you breathe more efficiently with COPD. These breathing techniques can also help improve breathing for people with asthma as well as people who don’t currently have lung issues but want to optimize their breathing.

 

According to the American Association for Respiratory Care, pursed-lip breathing and diaphragmatic breathing may increase your blood oxygen levels and help reduce shortness of breath. (4) A respiratory therapist can be very helpful if you need assistance with breathing techniques.

 

  1. Follow a Healthy Diet

 

A healthy diet can help manage and improve COPD symptoms. Some foods in particular should be mainstays when it comes to an anti-COPD diet while others should be majorly or entirely avoided. Your diet should definitely have plenty of fresh vegetables and fruits to ensure you gett lots of vitamins, minerals and fiber. Citrus fruits are especially helpful because they contain quercetin. Wild-caught fish, flaxseeds and chia seeds, along with other omega-3 foods, can provide anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids.

 

If you’re suffering with COPD symptoms, you definitely want to steer clear of conventional dairy since pasteurized dairy is mucus-producing and can plug the airways in the lungs. You always want to stay away from processed, canned and frozen foods and sugar as well. Additives, preservatives and food dyes are also known for contributing to breathing issues and even asthma attacks. (5)

 

  1. 4. Increase Water Intake Inside and Outside the Body

 

One of the common and frustrating COPD symptoms is having mucus collect in your airways. This mucus can be difficult to clear and result in persistent and uncontrollable coughing. One internal way you can improve this mucus problem is by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. Drink at least eight glasses of water daily to thin mucus and stay hydrated. (6)

 

Externally, you can increase the moisture content of the air in your home by using a humidifier. Humidifiers can also help make breathing easier. I like using one while I’m sleeping at night. (7)

 

  1. Exercise

 

When you’re having trouble breathing, exercise might seem like a terrible idea, but being sedentary won’t do anything to help your COPD symptoms. By regularly getting exercise, especially cardio workouts, you can strengthen your respiratory muscles and improve your overall endurance. (8)

 

About 40 percent of people with COPD experience high levels of depression and anxiety, which makes it even more difficult to quit smoking and comply with treatment. Exercise also increases endorphin levels, which improves mood, reduces depression and anxiety, and makes it easier to quit smoking.

 

 

  1. 6. Use Eucalyptus Oil

 

Eucalyptus oil can be very helpful for people with COPD. A study in Respiratory Research showed that cineole, the main constituent of eucalyptus essential oil, actually reduced exacerbations in people with COPD. It also reduced dyspnea (shortness of breath), and improved lung function as well as health status overall. Furthermore, the research suggested that cineole is an active controller and reducer of airway inflammation in COPD. (9)

 

To get the benefits of cineole, you can use eucalyptus oil in a diffuser and/or humidifier and breath in the anti-inflammatory air.

 

  1. Consume Ginseng

 

Ginseng is an herbal supplement that improves lung function and also decrease bacteria in the lungs. Panax ginseng in particular has a long history of use in Chinese medicine for respiratory conditions, including asthma and COPD.

 

A recent study published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Medicine highlighted therapeutic ginseng benefits. Panax ginseng and ginsenosides (active components of ginseng) appear to inhibit processes related to the development of COPD. (10)

 

  1. Take N-Acetylcysteine (NAC)

 

Supplementing with NAC helps decrease the severity and frequency of asthma attacks and improves overall lung function by increasing glutathione levels and thinning bronchial mucus. Glutathione fights against oxidative stress in the respiratory tract, which can make NAC a powerful and effective natural treatment for COPD. (11)

 

  1. Avoid Cold and Crowds

 

When you have COPD symptoms, it’s important to avoid things that make them even worse. I already told you that smoke and pollution are absolutely key to avoid. Another thing to be aware of is the fact that cold air can trigger bronchospasm, a sudden constriction in the muscles of airway walls that leads to shortness of breath. If the weather is really chilly, it’s a smart idea to avoid or reduce your time outdoors. You can also help your symptoms by putting on a face mask before going out into very cold temperatures. (12)

 

Another environmental hazard to avoid, especially if you have been prone to respiratory infections, is large crowds. Since respiratory infections can cause COPD symptoms to worsen, the less you’re in big crowds the lower your risk of being exposed to infectious germs. By no means am I encouraging you to be a hermit and never go to a mall again — I just want you to be smart and not unnecessarily put yourself in situations that could make your symptoms any worse.

 

  1. Reduce Stress

 

As with all health issues and diseases, stress only makes COPD symptoms, like airway inflammation and shortness of breath, worse. By reducing your daily stress and managing stress in healthy ways, you’re more relaxed, and this has a direct positive effect on your COPD symptoms. (13)

 

If you suffer from COPD, you should make time every day to relax both mentally and physically. Try some of these natural stress relievers to start.

 

The COPD Umbrella

 

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is an umbrella term that includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis and sometimes asthma. Here are some alarming stats on COPD:

 

  • According to the CDC, smoking accounts for as many as eight out of 10 COPD-related deaths. However, as many as one out of four Americans with COPD never smoked cigarettes.
  • A hallmark symptom of COPD is shortness of breath that gets worse over time. It’s often accompanied by a phlegm-producing cough and episodes of wheezing.
  • Typically, the first symptoms of emphysema occur in heavy smokers in their mid-50s.
  • Shortness of breath occurs with chronic bronchitis, but it may not be as severe during rest as it is in people with emphysema.
  • Classic symptoms of an asthma attack are coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath (dyspnea).
  • People with chronic asthma can get airway obstruction that makes them more likely to develop COPD.
  • Approximately 40 percent of those with COPD experience high levels of depression and anxiety, making it more difficult to comply with treatment and quit smoking.

COPD in the U.S.: (14)

 

  • Women were more likely to report COPD than men (6.7 percent vs. 5.2 percent).
  • Prevalence is lower among homemakers, students and the employed than among those who are unable to work, unemployed or retired.
  • Prevalence decreases as income increases (from 9.9 percent among those making less than $25,000 a year to 2.8 percent among those making more than $75,000).
  • 36.4 percent of those reporting COPD were former smokers.
  • 38.7 percent of those reporting COPD continued to smoke.
  • 43.7 percent of those reporting COPD had a history of asthma.

 

 

COPD Risk Factors & Root Causes

 

In developed countries, the central cause of COPD is tobacco smoking. In the developing world, COPD often occurs in people exposed to fumes from burning fuel for cooking and heating in poorly ventilated homes.

 

Root causes and risk factors for COPD include: (15)

 

  • Smoking — By far, the biggest risk factor for COPD is long-term cigarette smoking. The more years you smoke and the more cigarettes you smoke daily, the greater your risk for developing the disease. People who smoke pipes, cigars and marijuana are also at risk.
  • Tobacco smoke exposure — People exposed to large amounts of secondhand smoke are also at risk.
  • People with asthma who smoke — The combination of asthma and smoking increases the risk of COPD even more.
  • Occupational exposure to chemicals and dusts — Long-term exposure to chemical fumes, vapors and dusts in the workplace or elsewhere can irritate and inflame your lungs.
  • Age — COPD develops slowly over years. The majority of sufferers are at least 35 to 40 years old when symptoms begin.
  • Genetics — In about 1 percent of people with COPD, the disease results from a genetic disorder that causes low levels of a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin. Alpha-1-antitrypsin is made in the liver and secreted into the bloodstream to help protect the lungs. Other genetic factors also likely make certain smokers more susceptible to the disease.

 

The following groups are more likely to report COPD: (16)

 

  • Current or former smokers
  • Those with a history of asthma
  • People aged 65–74 years
  • Non-Hispanic whites
  • Women
  • Individuals who are unemployed, retired or unable to work
  • Individuals with less than a high school education
  • People with lower incomes
  • Individuals who are divorced, widowed or separated

 

 

COPD in Women

 

Deaths resulting from COPD are higher in women than in men. There are a few reasons why this happens: (17)

 

  • In the late 1960s, the tobacco industry intensely targeted women. This resulted in a huge increase in women smoking. We are still seeing new cases of smoking-related diseases, including COPD, as women age.
  • Women are more vulnerable than men to lung damage from cigarette smoke and other pollutants. Their lungs are smaller, and estrogen plays a role in worsening lung disease.
  • Women are often misdiagnosed. Because COPD has long been thought of as a man’s disease, many doctors still don’t expect to see it in women and miss the proper diagnosis.

 

 

COPD Symptoms Takeaways

 

  • COPD is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. More than 11 million people in the U.S. are diagnosed with COPD, while an estimated 24 million may have the disease without even realizing it.
  • COPD symptoms include shortness of breath while doing everyday activities or during physical activities, chronic cough, wheezing, chest tightness, frequent respiratory infections, blueness of the lips or fingernail beds, general fatigue and lack of energy, producing a lot of mucus or phlegm, having to clear your throat first thing in the morning due to excess mucus in your lungs and unintended weight loss (in later stages). People with COPD are likely to experience episodes called exacerbations. This is when symptoms become worse than usual and persist for at least several days.
  • There are four stages of COPD: Stage 1, very mild COPD; Stage 2, moderate COPD; Stage 3, severe emphysema/chronic bronchitis; Stage 4, very sever COPD.
  • To naturally treat COPD symptoms, avoid smoking in every form, improve breathing, follow a healthy diet, increase water intake inside and outside the body, exercise, use eucalyptus oil, consume ginseng, take NAC, avoid cold and crowds, and reduce stress.
  • The root causes and risk factors for COPD include smoking, tobacco smoke exposure, having asthma and smoking, occupational exposure to chemicals and dusts, age, and genetics. In addition, deaths resulting from COPD are higher in women than in men.

 

Please share with family and loved ones, and call us if you have concerns and question about what to do in your healthcare needs.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article   JA

312-972-Well

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Smoking and 5 Other Things You Should Do to Get an Ulcer

ulcer
Human stomach ulcer, illustration

Smoking and 5 Other Things You Should Do To Get An Ulcer

 

Six Things To Avoid Getting An Ulcer.

 

In the United States, more than six million Americans are diagnosed with ulcers, otherwise known as peptic ulcer disease (PUD), each year. Ulcers are the formation of painful, open sores, which develop in the lining of the stomach or at the first section of the small intestine, called the duodenum. Ulcers can have severe health consequences if left untreated. However, by knowing the risk factors that lead to ulcers, you can learn ways to minimize your chances of developing peptic ulcer disease.

 

Below are the most common risk factors for developing peptic ulcer disease. [1]

 

H pylori Infection

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacterial infection found in the digestive tract that has been closely associated with developing ulcers. According to the American College of Gastroenterology, it is estimated that 30-40% of the U.S.

 

population is infected with H. pylori, but most do not even know it. [3] This unawareness is because the infection often remains dormant, or quiet, without any symptoms. Over time, H. pylori bacteria can damage the lining of the stomach and duodenum, exposing it to acid and digestive juices, which increases the risk of developing an ulcer. If a person is found to have H. pylori present in the digestive tract, antibiotics can be prescribed to treat the infection. Unfortunately, most infections are silent so many people do not learn they are infected until they develop an ulcer.

 

It isn’t that clear yet as to how H. pylori is spread, but intake of contaminated food or water and close contact with an infected person are believed to be the means of transmission.

 

Therefore, it is crucial for food handlers at home and in restaurants to practice good hygiene. Proper hand washing is still the best way to prevent the spread of H.pylori, if you have been diagnosed.

 

 

Long-Term Use of NSAIDs

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used to relieve pain and inflammation associated with a variety of conditions.

 

When NSAIDs are taken on a daily basis they can damage the mucosal lining of the stomach or duodenum because they inhibit the production of prostaglandin, a substance that protects and keeps the stomach lining healthy. Without prostaglandin, the stomach lining is exposed to the harmful effects of stomach acids. According to the American Journal of Gastroenterology as many as 25% of chronic NSAID users will develop an ulcer. The risk increases when NSAID use is combined with H. pylori infection.  [1]

 

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

GERD is a condition where stomach contents back up to the esophagus. When this occurs, the acidic stomach juices can cause severe irritation in both the esophagus and upper stomach. Over time the acid can break down the lining of the esophagus and cause ulcers.

 

Personal History of Tobacco Use

As if smoking wasn’t bad enough already, it can increase the risk of developing ulcers. While smoking is not found to increase acid production, it has been found to increase the risk of H. pylori infection. The harmful chemicals in cigarettes reduce the protective factors in the stomach and provide an environment conducive for H. pylori to flourish. Smoking also affects the circulation to the digestive lining which can delay healing and cause ulcers to recur.

 

Stressful Lifestyle

 

Stress is often associated with ulcers. It does not directly cause peptic ulcer disease, but it is considered a contributing factor. In a recent study, it was determined that stress really does have a role in ulcers. It is thought that through possible mechanisms of increased acid, increased bad habit coping skills (smoking), and poor sleep hygiene all make stress a risk factor. [5]

 

Personal or Family History of Ulcers

Anyone who has previously been diagnosed with an ulcer is at increased risk for developing another one in the future. Studies have also shown that if you have a family history of ulcers your chances could be increased to develop one yourself. [2, 3, 4]

 

Although peptic ulcer disease is very common, you can lower your chances of ending up with an ulcer by taking some simple precautions.  I always tell my patients to do what they probably have been told their whole lives; wash your hands, don’t smoke and don’t stress out so much. Then all you have to do is keep the NSAID use down and treat any GERD if it starts. Remember, if you have any symptoms of an ulcer talk to your doctor as soon as possible.

 

References

 

Gastrointestinal ulcers, role of aspirin, and clinical outcomes: pathobiology, diagnosis, and treatment., Cryer B, Mahaffey KW.;  J Multidiscip Healthc. 2014 Mar 3;7:137-46. doi: 10.2147/JMDH.S54324. eCollection 2014

Ulcers; Kenneth Brown MD; http://kennethbrownmd.com/

Peptic Ulcer Disease, American College of Gastroenterology;http://patients.gi.org/topics/peptic-ulcer-disease/

Peptic Ulcer Disease, WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/digestive-diseases-peptic-ulcer-disease

Psychological stress increases risk for peptic ulcer, regardless of Helicobacter pylori infection or use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Levenstein S, Clin Gastro Hep. 2015 Mar;13

Health and Disease, Lifestyle

U S Government admits that Cannabis Kills Cancer Cells

cannabis

US Government Admits that Cannabis kills cancer cells

 

By Nick Allen, Washington

3:03PM BST 24 Aug 2015

The US government has confirmed that cannabis can kill cancer cells after the drug did so in tests on mice and rats, according to the National Cancer Institute.

The development will provide further ammunition for pro-legalisation campaigners.

On its website The National Cancer Institute, part of the US department of health, said: “Laboratory and animal studies have shown that cannabinoids (the active ingredient in cannabis) may be able to kill cancer cells while protecting normal cells.

“They may inhibit tumour growth by causing cell death, blocking cell growth, and blocking the development of blood vessels needed by tumours to grow.”

The studies in rodents show that cannabinoids may reduce the risk of colon, liver and breast cancer, and could make chemotherapy more effective.

But researchers added: “At this time, there is not enough evidence to recommend that patients inhale or ingest cannabis as a treatment for cancer-related symptoms or side effects of cancer therapy.”

In many US states where cannabis is already legal for medicinal use, cancer patients have long been using the drug to ease pain.

The Cancer Research charity reacted cautiously, saying there was no evidence of a similar effect in humans.

A spokesman said: “There isn’t enough reliable evidence to prove that cannabinoids, whether natural or synthetic, can effectively treat cancer in patients, although research is ongoing around the world.”

The charity has also warned patients to be wary of fraudsters selling cannabis treatments.

Health and Disease

What Happens to Your Body When You Smoke

cigarettersmoking

What Happens to Your Body When You Smoke

According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 18 out of every 100 U.S. adults aged 18 years or older (17.8 percent) smoke cigarettes today. This means an estimated 42.1 million adults in the United States are cigarette smokers. Even more stunning; on average, smoking causes 480,000 deaths per year in the country, which is roughly 1,300 deaths per day.1 It is expected that eight million people will die in 2030 if the current smoking rate continues.

Background of Cigarette Smoking

Smoking is said to stimulate pleasing and enjoyable emotions, and smokers claim that it helps boost their mood, alleviates minor depression and small fits of anger, improves concentration and short-term memory, and can also provide a modest sense of well-being. This is because cigarettes contain the addictive substance nicotine that stimulates dopamine in the brain, which is responsible for the “pleasurable sensations.”

However, the more you smoke, the more your nerve cells become immune to the pleasure brought on by smoking. As a result, smokers tend to increase their intake of nicotine to get that desirable feeling from smoking.2

Despite the “pleasure” that one gets from puffing a cigarette, remember this: smoking comes with devastating health effects.

If you think smoking an e-cig makes a difference, it doesn’t. Researchers actually found that a brand of e-cigarette contains more than 10 times the level of carcinogen contained in a regular cigarette. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, both harmful toxins, were also found in the vapor produced by several types of e-cigarettes.

Remember while smoking makes you feel good for a period of time, it slowly kills your body, and is the LEADING preventable cause of death in the US.3

What Are the Side Effects of Smoking Cigarettes?

Smoking harms your body and may cause permanent damage to your health. If you’re still not convinced about its dangers, take a look at some of smoking’s side effects.

Short-Term Effects

Smokers tend to have smelly clothes and hair, bad breath, and yellow or brown teeth stains. Your physical appearance can also suffer as smoking can lead to premature wrinkles, gum and tooth loss, and sudden weight change. Stomach ulcers and weakened immune system are also possible smoking side effects you might experience.4

For young people, there is a high probability that they will continue smoking into adulthood. As a result, it will impair their lung function and growth. Teens who smoke are also 22 times more likely to use cocaine.

According to a new Australian study, female smokers may experience worse menstrual cramps than those who don’t. It is likely to happen as the amount of oxygen that travels to the uterus decreases when you smoke. Researchers say that women who started to smoke at the tender age of 13 have a 59 percent risk of having painful menstruation, while those who started to smoke at age 14 or 15 have 50 percent risk of experiencing it.5

Long-Term Effects

Many people don’t begin to feel the severe side effects of smoking until years later. Once you begin to feel the symptoms, you know damage has already been done. Some damaging side effects of smoking cigarettes include:

  • Cardiovascular health problems. Smoking poses a great danger to your heart and blood vessels. It damages the structure of your heart and the way your blood vessels work.6 Smoking increases your risk of having a heart disease by two to four times, as it causes the blood vessels in your heart to thicken and grow thinner. It makes your heart beat faster, your blood pressure rise, and causes your blood to clot. When a clot blocks the blood flow to your heart, it cannot get enough oxygen, which damages a part of your heart’s muscle or even kills it.

People who smoke have a higher risk of atherosclerosis, a disease where the plaque liquids build in the arteries. As time progresses, it will cause your arteries to harden and narrow, which will limit the flow of the oxygen-filled blood to other parts of your body.

Smoking may also lead to coronary heart disease (CHD) once the plaque liquids build up in the coronary arteries. It can lead to chest pain, heart attack, heart failure, arrhythmias, or death.

Another side effect of smoking cigarettes is Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.), which happens when plaque liquids build up to the blood vessels that deliver blood to the head, organs, and limbs. Smokers who have diabetes and take birth control pills are at greater risk of having serious ailments to the heart and blood vessels. 7

  • Increased risk of stroke. Smokers have a two to four times increased risk of having a stroke than non-smokers. It happens when a clot blocks the blood from your brain or when an artery around or in your brain explodes.8
  • Respiratory problems. Our lungs are equipped with a layer of internal mucus that serves as a protective shield for foreign materials that we inhale, by wiping off these contaminants with small hairs called cilia. But with smokers, cilia cannot function properly as these tiny hairs work rather slowly. As a result, you cannot cough, sneeze, or swallow to get these toxins out of your body.9

Smoking can trigger or make an asthma attack worse.10 It may also cause Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. In emphysema, the air sacs in your lungs eventually lose their elasticity and start to worsen. Chronic bronchitis happens when there is a swelling in the linings of your lungs and it constrains your breathing.11

  • Pregnancy complications. Pregnant women who smoke have a higher risk of preterm (early) delivery, miscarriage, or stillbirth. They may encounter Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), ectopic pregnancy, and orofacial clefts for the newborns. Women also have a great tendency of having weaker bones after menopause.12
  • Reproductive health function. Men who smoke may encounter erectile dysfunction, poor sperm quality, and sperm defects. For women, smoking may cause reduced fertility.13
  • Cigarettes contain over 7,000 chemicals, some of which can cause cancer. These include formaldehyde, benzene, polonium 210, and vinyl chloride.14 Even worse, smoking can cause various kinds of cancers anywhere in your body, not just in your lungs, such as: 15
Bladder Blood (acute myeloid leukemia) Cervix
Colon and rectum (colorectal) Esophagus Kidney and ureter
Larynx Liver Oropharynx
Pancreas Stomach Trachea, bronchus, and lung

Radioactive Chemical Found in Fertilizers Leads to Lung Cancer

Did you know that your body also accumulates harmful radioactive chemicals from cigarettes? These dangerous elements come from the pesticides used on tobacco fields. While it is true that smoking cigarettes can cause cancer, there is a more specific substance that is the root cause of cancer among smokers. Tobacco fields typically use calcium phosphate fertilizers, which contain polonium-210. When polonium-210 decays, it releases alpha particles that can damage human cells they come into contact with.

Research suggests that main lung damage comes from the radiation emitted by these fertilizers.16,17,18 It also showed that polonium, specifically, causes cancer in laboratory animals.19 Moreover, according to a study in 200920 the radiation that you get from smoking 1 ½ cigarette packs is tantamount to 300 chest x-ray films per year.

A 2011 report from Nicotine and Tobacco Research21 also revealed there are internal documents stating that the tobacco industry have recognized the danger brought by these radioactive chemicals. According to these papers, acid wash was found to be an effective solution in removing polonium-210 from the tobacco leaves, but the industry avoided using it as it would lessen the pleasurable effect of nicotine to smokers.

The tobacco industry will certainly not be your number one motivator in stopping you from smoking, even if they know that this may lead to your death. It is now your decision to throw away your smoking habit for good and choose a healthier lifestyle, which can add more years to your life.

What Happens When a Smoker Quits

The process of quitting requires determination and patience as it will affect you both physically and mentally, so be prepared for its withdrawal period. But nonetheless, it will greatly benefit in many ways even just minutes after quitting.

Tips on How to Quit Smoking

People who have been addicted to smoking for a long time still have hope in turning over a new leaf. I suggest that you practice these prevention techniques to help you quit smoking:22

  • Choose a Quit Day. Pick a day that is not stressful for you so that you can prepare yourself. It can be your birthday, your anniversary, or even just the first day of the month.
  • Don’t Quit Alone. Telling someone about your decision to quit can give an enormous support when you feel alone in your battle to quit.
  • Know Your Nicotine Replacement Options. Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) can be a great help in quitting smoking as it can help you overcome the withdrawal symptoms. It is considered safe for all smokers except for pregnant women and people with heart disease.23

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved five forms of nicotine replacement therapy (patch, gum, nasal spray, inhalers, and lozenges) for those who are attempting to quit. But it is still best to ask a medical professional about which form of NRT is most suitable for you.24

  • Get Smart About Your Smoking. Keeping a journal can help you track the situations that helped you up or pushed you down in your attempt to quit smoking, so you can determine how you can deal with them without reaching for a cigarette.
  • Identify Your Triggers. Make a list of all the things that you have done in the past that involves smoking. Before your quit day, prepare yourself on how you will deal with these things.
  • Change the What, Where, When and How You Smoke. Altering you habits – the time and places where you used to smoke – can help you during your attempt to quit.
  • Spring Clean. Wash and throw away everything that reminds you of smoking.
  • Get Support. It is great if you can get help from communities of former smokers or a clinic that specializes in helping those who want quit.
  • Quit Day and Beyond. You have to adjust your behavior to identify what triggers you to smoke.
  • If You’re Going to Do It, Do It! Commitment is key to be successful in your attempt to quit. It will certainly be hard but it is worth it.

Quitting smoking may be hard, but I advise you to do it as early as now. I really believe that having a healthy, smoke-free lifestyle will not only benefit you but your family as well.

Health and Wellness Associates

312-972-WELL

Archived Article

Lifestyle, Rx to Wellness

Natural Compound Helps Smokers Quit

smoking2

Natural Compound Helps Smokers Quit

A study at New Zealand’s University of Auckland found that a natural, inexpensive compound called cytisine that has been used for more than 40 years in Europe to help smokers kick the habit, is more effective than nicotine replacement therapy, (NRT).

After using cytosine for 25 days, about 40 percent of people said they had not smoked compared to 31 percent of those who used NRT, and those taking cytisine were more likely to be non-smokers after 6 months.

To the brain, cytosine looks a little like nicotine, and so it works to alleviate any urges to smoke and reduces the severity of nicotine withdrawal symptoms.

If you do smoke while using cytisine it will be less satisfying – making quitting easier.

Cytisine quit smoking aids are widely available over the internet or health food stores.

If you need assistance with trying to quit smoking, we here at Health and Wellness Associates will be happy to assist.

Health and Wellness Associates

312-972-WELL