Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Love Your Kidneys!

Keep Calm & Love Your Kidneys during National Kidney Month! <3

 

It is National Kidney Month, which means
that it is time for you to understand the
importance of managing kidney disease and
how to achieve optimal kidney health so
that you can appreciate these wonderful
organs and keep them healthy.
Diet & Kidney Disease
Managing kidney disease—especially at the
beginning—is essential. You want to ensure
proper nutrition while minimizing stress
and maximizing kidney function. There is
no one special diet for everyone, though.
Your diet depends on your medical history,
lifestyle habits, and current kidney function.
Your diet may change over time, depending
on your kidney health. There are some
nutrients that you need to watch out for,
including protein, energy foods, sodium,
potassium, phosphorus, and fluids.
Protein
Foods such as meat, fish, poultry, soy, beans,
and lentils, for example, are rich protein
sources. When protein is broken down,
it creates the waste product urea. Your
body needs to eliminate urea, which must
be filtered through your kidneys. If you
consume high amounts of protein, you
can increase stress on the kidneys due to
increased levels of urea produced. If the urea
fails to be eliminated, it will cause increased

blood-urea levels. High amounts of urea
can lead to fatigue, headaches, nausea, and
a bad taste in your mouth. However, if you
do not eat enough protein, your body will
have a tough time fighting infections, you
will have low energy levels, and you will
lose muscle mass. The amount of protein
that you need to consume depends on your
disease state and treatment regimen. Speak
to your dietitian to review your specific
needs.
Energy Foods
Your energy foods are all the foods that
provide you with energy or calories. These
include carb choices such as fruits, starches,
grains, sugars, and vegetables, as well as fats
and oils. If you are restricting your energy
intake from protein, you need to make sure
to replace those calories from other sources
in order to keep up your energy levels and
maintain a healthy body weight.
Sodium
Since sodium affects your bodily fluids and
blood pressure, it is important to limit your
intake. Watch your intake of high-sodium
foods, including processed foods, deli meats,
canned foods, convenient foods, fast foods,
salty snacks, and so forth. Consider using
other ways to enhance flavors, such as
lemon, spices, and herbs.

Potassium
Potassium is important for your muscles and nerves
to function. Too much or too little potassium in your
blood can affect your heart beat. Whether you need
to limit your intake or even increase your intake
depends on your disease state, kidney function, and
treatment plan. Treatments like dialysis will affect the
amount that you should be consuming, as will certain
medications. Your doctor will let you know, and your
dietitian can work with you to create an appropriate
meal plan. Foods that are high in potassium include
sweet potatoes, squash, bananas, oranges, tomatoes,
and beans.
Phosphorus
Phosphorus plays an important role in keeping your
bones healthy and strong. However, as your kidney
function declines, the phosphate levels in your blood
will increase. This can result in itchiness and joint
pain, as well as loss of calcium in your bones. You
may need to limit your intake of foods that are high
in phosphorus, such as dairy products and protein
foods.
Make sure to speak with a dietitian to help you
develop a meal plan that includes some of these
foods in levels that are right for you, as these foods
contain many important nutrients that you still need
to consume. Also, make sure to read ingredient labels
for hidden sources of phosphorus. Some processed
foods such as deli meats and sodas may contain
phosphates, phosphoric acid, or sodium phosphate

Calcium & Vitamin D
These supplements are essential for good bone
health. Your bones are comprised mostly of calcium,
and you need vitamin D to help absorb it. However,
with diminished kidney function, your kidneys may
not be able to convert vitamin D into its active form.
Therefore, your doctor may recommend that you take
some active vitamin-D and calcium supplements.
Your doctor will be monitoring your blood-calcium
levels, though, so make sure to take these only as
prescribed.
Fluids
Your body needs fluids to survive, but if your kidneys
are not working properly, you may need to reduce
your intake. As your kidney function declines,
they produce less urine, leading to increased fluid
retention. This can cause swelling in your extremities
and face and may also increase your blood pressure
and cause difficulty breathing. However, limit your
intake only as advised by your doctor. Getting too
little fluids can damage your kidneys.
Optimal nutrition is important to prevent
malnutrition, have good energy levels throughout
the day for performing daily tasks, maintain a healthy
weight, and prevent muscle loss, as well as preventing
infection. These are all great reasons to manage and
reduce your risks of kidney disease.
Other ways of reducing your risk of developing
kidney disease are by decreasing your risk of

developing chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart
disease. We discussed a bit about managing diabetes
during Diabetes Awareness Month in November and
touched on Heart Health last month. Now, we will
discuss why it is important to ensure optimal health
and properly manage your kidney disease.
Diabetes
One of the most common causes of end-stage renal
disease or kidney disease is uncontrolled diabetes.
Firstly, you should understand a bit more about
how your kidneys act as a filtration system. Your
body requires a certain amount of protein each
day. After consuming the protein, your body digests
it and absorbs the essential components into the
blood stream, while needing to eliminate the waste
products. The components of the broken-down
protein get filtered through tiny capillaries and then
through even tinier holes called “nephrons.” The
blood flows through all these tiny filters, but the
essential protein components, red blood cells, and
other important substances that are too big to be
able to pass through do not get eliminated, so they
get filtered out. The waste products are able to flow
through the nephrons and therefore enter the urine
to be eliminated.
Unfortunately, uncontrolled diabetes complicates
this process. Whether your insulin is not working
properly or you just don’t have enough, having high
blood sugar puts a lot of stress on your kidneys. When
sugar levels in your blood are abundant, your kidneys
have to filter a lot more blood, making the filters
work much harder. Eventually, the kidneys begin
to leak from all the pressure, resulting in protein
leaking through into the urine. As long as bloodsugar levels are high, further stress and damage on
your kidneys’ filtering system continues. This leads
to further damage, loss in filtration ability, buildup
of waste products, and eventually kidney failure.
Unfortunately, at this point, your only options are a
kidney transplant or dialysis.
High Blood Pressure
Kidneys are made up of many blood vessels that
get smaller and smaller as you get deeper into
their filtering system. Because kidneys have a very
important role in filtering all of the blood, they

receive a high volume of blood flow regularly. Blood
is rich in many essential nutrients, including oxygen.
Over time, many factors such as smoking, poor
diet, lack of physical activity, and age contribute to
narrowing and hardening of the arteries. The high
blood volume passing through the filtration system
in combination with high blood pressure puts a lot
of pressure on these arteries, further weakening
them. These damaged vessels reduce blood flow to
the kidney’s tissues. They also prevent flow to the
smallest vessels, the nephrons.
Reduced blood flow or elimination of blood flow
altogether means that the tissues are failing to receive
essential nutrients and oxygen, and they lose their
ability to properly function. Therefore, they are no
longer able to efficiently filter blood, fluids, and other
nutrients or regulate hormones—especially those
that are necessary for controlling blood pressure.
When the kidneys are so damaged that they are
no longer able to efficiently regulate blood pressure
in combination with chronic blood pressure, this
leads to dire consequences. Further damages can
occur, and more arteries become blocked, leading to
eventual kidney failure.
So, be aware of your kidneys and appreciate
all that they do for you. Take good care of them by
staying fit, eating well, and being healthy!

 
Why Should You Take Care of
Your Kidneys?
Kidneys are essential for your well-being. It is true
that you can survive with only one viable kidney,
but you want to do everything possible to keep
them both healthy and working. Your kidneys have
several important functions, but their main role is
to filter your blood and remove waste products and
excess fluid from your body and eliminate them
through your urine. While they are filtering out the
waste, they are also reabsorbing many important
nutrients so that your body can reuse them.
Still unconvinced of their importance? Your
kidneys are also responsible for eliminating excess
drugs from your body. They help balance your
body’s fluids by regulating the amount of sodium,
potassium phosphorus, and acid levels in the body.
They also control the production of red blood cells

and produce an active form of vitamin D that helps
control calcium metabolism and promotes strong and
healthy bones. More so, your kidneys release certain
hormones that are responsible for helping regulate
blood pressure.
Keeping your kidneys healthy is extremely
important. If you don’t, they will fail to perform all
the essential aforementioned roles, which will have
debilitating consequences. Unhealthy kidneys lead to
kidney disease and can also cause heart disease and
associated risks such as high blood pressure, stroke,
heart attacks, and death. Kidney disease can also
lead to weakened bones, osteoporosis, anemia, nerve
damage, and complete kidney failure.
Reduce Your Risk of Developing
Kidney Disease
Get Fit
Engage in regular physical activity. Aim for at least 30
minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity five
times a week (or any combination for a total of 150
minutes per week at least every other day in bouts of
at least 10 minutes). Also, include some stretching
and strength training at least three times per week.
A combination of both will improve your heart
health and blood flow and strengthen your bones and
muscles.
Control Your Weight
Maintain a healthy weight with a body-mass index
(BMI) of between 18.5 and 24.9. Monitor your weight
regularly (without obsessing). Don’t weigh yourself
more than once per week, but take note of any
drastic changes. If you notice your weight starting to
slowly creep upward, consider re-evaluating your diet
and physical-activity regime or speak to a registered
dietitian for tips to manage your weight.
Eat a Balanced Diet
Avoid any trendy fad diets, and stick to a regular,
consistent meal plan. Aim for three meals per day with
snacks in between. Avoid going longer than three or
four hours without eating anything. A balanced meal
should consist of half of your plate filled with at least
two different types of colorful vegetables. A quarter
of your plate should be a lean protein choice, such as
fish or chicken, and a quarter of your plate should be
a whole grain like brown rice or quinoa.

Healthy snacks include a carbohydrate or a
vegetable and a protein. Snack ideas such as celery
and a tablespoon of peanut butter or a medium-sized
apple with a small handful of nuts are good options.
Drink in Moderation
Limit your alcohol intake to no more than one glass a
day for women and maximum of two glasses per day
for men.
Don’t Smoke
This should go without saying.
Stay Hydrated
Drink six to eight glasses of water per day. Water is
calorie-free and is your best option. Avoid high-sugar
beverages, as they only add unnecessary calories and
often replace nutrient-dense choices.
Monitor Your Meds
Take all of your medications as prescribed by
your doctor. Also, be cautious when taking some
over-the-counter medications such as aspirin,
naxoproxin, and ibuprofen, which may cause harm
to your kidneys. Always check with your family
doctor.
Stay on Top of Your Health
Know your family history, as this is a good indicator
of any increased risk. Make sure to visit your
family physician annually to keep your health in
check. Your physical should include regular blood
tests to monitor your cholesterol levels and check
your creatinine levels and glomerular-filtration
rate (GFR) for evaluating your kidney function.
You should also check your blood-pressure levels.
Ideally, your blood pressure should be 120/80;
however, as you get older (as long as you don’t have
a history of kidney disease), your blood pressure
should be below 140/90.
As you can see, whether you’re reducing your
risk of developing kidney disease or trying to
manage it, it is vital to make healthy lifestyle
choices.

Dr. Victor Marchione

 

Remember, We Are In This Together!

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-
Health and Wellness Associates
EHS Telehealth

WordPress:  https://healthandwellnessassociates.co/

Diets and Weight Loss, Foods, Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Want To Eat For Your Heart? Avoid These 4 Foods

Want To Eat For Your Heart? Avoid These 4 Foods

 

If your dentist, your diet coach, and your personal trainer haven't already told you to stop drinking soda, then your financial advisor might be next on the list. Your soda habit is not only adding inches to your waistline, but it's expensive as well. For the sake of your health and for the sake of your wallet, now might be a good time to stop drinking soda.

Past tips have discussed the best foods for your heart. Today, we cover some foods and ingredients that are not so heart-healthy. Minimize these inflammatory aggravators in your diet to help promote optimal cardiovascular functioning.

  1. Trans-fats. Found in most margarines, snack foods, processed foods and some cooking oils, these fats (often listed on food labels as “hydrogenated” or “partially hydrogenated” oil) can reduce HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels and raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels. Also, avoid heated polyunsaturated fats, such as vegetable or soybean oil used for deep-frying. These fats are oxidized or damaged, therefore regular consumption is likely to have a variety of negative health effects.
  2. Animal protein. Excessive animal protein has been shown to raise levels of homocysteine, an amino acid that in high concentrations may contribute to heart disease. Instead of animal protein, try whole soy protein – aim for two servings of whole organic soy, such as tofu or edamame, per day. You should track your homocysteine levels and if elevated, consider B-vitamin supplementation.
  3. Refined carbohydrates. Cookies, cakes, crackers, soft breads, chips and sodas can increase triglyceride levels and lower HDL.
  4. Sodium. Excessive sodium has been linked to high blood pressure and heart disease. The main sources of sodium intake are breads, processed and canned foods, along with restaurant fare. Adding a dash of salt to your homemade meals is negligible in comparison and may help provide enhanced flavor to keep you eating more at home.

 

Contact us with help determining the right path for you to take.

Health Wellness Associates

healthwellnessassociates@gmail.com

Foods, Uncategorized

Avocado Chicken Salad

avocadochicken

 

 

Avocado Chicken Salad

 

Most store bought and deli chicken salad is made with a ton of high-calorie mayonnaise, dark and white meat chicken, and is slapped on some form of white bread. It might have a tiny piece of wilted lettuce to make you feel good. While you may think you’re making a healthy choice, in reality, that chicken salad sandwich is probably loaded with fat, sodium, and calories.

 

Make a better-for-you version with wholesome ingredients like white meat chicken breast, avocado, Greek yogurt, and plenty of veggies for a flavorful, creamy meal. It’s also loaded with protein from the chicken and yogurt and has satisfying healthy fats and fiber thanks to the avocado. It also has much less sodium and saturated fat than traditional chicken salad, making it a smart choice for lunch.

 

Ingredients

1 large chicken breast (about 2 cups shredded)

garlic powder, to taste

freshly cracked black pepper

1 small avocado, mashed

2 tablespoon plain nonfat Greek yogurt

2 tablespoon lemon or lime juice

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

freshly cracked pepper

1/2 cup diced onion, any kind

1/2 cup diced celery (about 1 rib)

Preparation

Heat oven to 350F.  Season chicken breast with garlic powder and pepper. Place in a baking dish and cover with foil. Bake 25 to 35 minutes, or until a thermometer inserted into the center reads 165F. Remove chicken and let cool before shredding.

In a large bowl, smash avocado. Stir in yogurt, lime juice, garlic powder and pepper. Stir in chicken, onion and celery. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

 

 

Ingredient Variations and Substitutions

Dress up your avocado chicken salad with cilantro, cumin, and diced jalapeno for a Southwest flavor.

 

For a dairy-free version, omit the yogurt and swap in more avocado (about the equal amount).

 

Cooking and Serving Tips

Save a step (and time) by making this recipe with leftover cooked chicken. You can make this recipe to have on hand for lunches all week long. It tastes great rolled in a whole wheat tortilla, on a sliced of toasted whole wheat bread, or on top of a fresh green salad.

Call us with all your food concerns, for your condition

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

DR G Carney

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

 

 

Health and Disease, Uncategorized

Banning the Salt Shaker Has Little Effect on Your Heart Health

saltshaker

Banning the Salt Shaker Has Little Effect on Heart Health

 

If you think tossing out the salt shaker can help you cut down on sodium and boost your heart health, think again. Most of the salt that Americans consume comes from processed foods and restaurant meals — and is not added at the table or in home-cooked dishes, a new study finds.

The findings, published online in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, indicate only 10 percent of salt in the diets of 450 Americans came from food prepared at home. About half of that was added at the table.

 

But restaurant meals and processed foods — such as crackers, breads, and soups — accounted for nearly three-quarters of the participants’ salt intake

 

“Telling patients to lay off the salt shaker isn’t enough,” says Dr. Lisa J. Harnack, lead author of the study and a professor at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

 

“Rather, commercially processed and restaurant foods should be the primary focus when educating patients on strategies for lowering sodium in the diet. Food manufacturers and restaurants should be encouraged to lower the sodium content in their food products to support Americans in consuming a diet consistent with sodium intake recommendations.”

 

The average American adult consumes far more sodium each day than the recommended maximum of 2,300 milligrams, researchers say. Sodium is an important contributor to high blood pressure, one of the leading causes of heart attack and stroke.

 

To get a clear picture of Americans’ swooning love affair with salt, Harnack’s team recruited 150 participants ages 18-74 in each of these three cities:

 

Birmingham, Ala.

Minneapolis, Minn.

Palo Alto, Calif.

Half the participants were male, and half were female. Equal percentages of the participants were:

 

Non-Hispanic white

Hispanic

African-American

Asian

Participants visited a clinic once at the beginning of the study and then kept records of daily food intake for four days, which they reported to researchers in four telephone interviews. They also provided samples of salt to replicate the amount they added to food at home.

 

 

Across age groups, the researchers found similar intakes of dietary sodium: an average of 3,501 mg per day (higher than recommended daily maximum of 2,300 mg — about a teaspoonful — for healthy adults). This average even more dramatically exceeds the 1,500 mg daily limit recommended for 70 percent of American adults based on their age, race or ethnicity, or existing high blood pressure.

 

In addition to restaurants and processed foods found in stores, the researchers found that the most common sources of dietary sodium were:

 

Sodium naturally found in food (14.2 percent)

Sodium added in home food preparation 5.6 percent)

Sodium added to food at the table (4.9 percent)

Sodium in home tap water, dietary supplements, and antacids accounted for less than 0.5 percent of total intake

Sodium can be difficult to avoid, especially when people eat a lot of processed food from grocery stores or restaurants. To address this serious health threat, the Institute of Medicine recommends gradually decreasing sodium levels in commercially processed foods.

According to the American Heart Association, restaurant and prepackaged food companies must be a part of the solution to reduce sodium and give Americans the healthy options they need and deserve. The AHA encourages packaged food companies and restaurants to reduce the sodium in their products to help make meaningful impact on the health of all Americans. The association has developed a sodium reduction campaign to help.

 

But there’s much consumers can do for themselves, Harnack says.

 

“If you’re aiming to limit your sodium intake to the recommended level of less than 2,300 milligrams per day, you’ll need to choose foods wisely when grocery shopping and dining out,” she notes.

 

“For packaged foods, the nutrition fact panel may be useful in identifying lower sodium products, and for menu items diners can request sodium content information. Also, if you frequently add salt to food at the table or in home food preparation, consider using less.”

 

A recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report shows that more than 89 percent of adults and 90 percent of children exceed the recommended limits for sodium, not including salt added to food at the table.

 

This includes more than 75 percent of these at-risk populations:

 

Adults over age 50

African-Americans

People diagnosed with either hypertension or pre-hypertension

The authors observed excessive sodium intake in all demographic groups. But they found that such intake was more common in men than in women (98 percent versus 80 percent), and in white adults than in black adults (90 percent versus 85 percent).

 

They also found that Americans ages 19-50 had the highest sodium consumption as well as the highest calorie consumption.

 

For More information on salt intake, sodium levels, and supplements needed to reduce salt, call us and make an appointment for your personal health care plan.

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived Article

Dr J Jaranson

312-972-WELL

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Foods, Rx to Wellness, Uncategorized

Sodium: Myths and Facts

salt

Know Your Sodium Myths & Facts

 

Did you know that 30% of Americans are currently living with the silent disease high blood pressure? In fact, half of those with high blood pressure do not have it under control and 30% of people with it do not even know they have it! Even if you do not have high blood pressure, most people are consuming way too much sodium. While it may not present itself as a problem today, too much sodium can lead to high blood pressure and kidney disease, and once you have high blood pressure, you are at increased risk of heart failure, stroke, vision loss, and kidney disease.

Get your facts straight about sodium so that you make sure you are on the right path to a healthy life!

Myth: You can tell what foods are high in sodium because they taste salty.

Many times, when I am conducting a taste test, people think that their sugary cereal has minimal sodium. When comparing products, most people get it wrong. The same can be said about the amounts of added sugar. You cannot always taste the sodium found in products.

Did you know that sodium is commonly used as a preservative? Sodium helps preserve foods because it can kill off many harmful bacteria. When a food item is concentrated with sodium, certain bacteria are unable to thrive, allowing perishable foods to last longer (as long as they are refrigerated).

Sodium also allows the taste and quality to last longer, improving a product’s overall shelf-life. Check out the packaging of any processed foods, such as cereals, crackers, breads, or chips. Many people are surprised when they read the labels. Your sugary cereals are likely loaded with sodium. If you are reading the nutrition facts table, make sure that your total snack has less than 200 milligrams (mg) of sodium and that your total meal has less than 400 mg to 500 mg of sodium.

The worst types of foods include processed foods, such as pizzas, deli meats, soups, sauces, and cheese.

 

Fact: Most of the foods we eat contain too much sodium.

Unfortunately, we live in a society that thrives on convenient and quick meals and snacks. That means higher consumption of processed foods and lower consumption of homemade meals.

Ready-to-eat meals and snacks are loaded with ridiculous amounts of sodium. A single meal may even contain more than your recommended daily intake (RDI). Not only is sodium used for flavoring, but it is also used as a preservative. Unfortunately, this is the reason why people’s sodium intakes are through the roof, resulting in high blood pressure and increased risk of heart disease.

Your best bet is to consume whole foods and to be in control of your food preparation. Cooking can be quick, easy, fun, and tasty, but most importantly, it is almost always more healthful. You are in control of what goes into your dishes.

Myth: Food does not taste good without salt.

You would be surprised by the many ways in which you can add flavor to your dishes without reaching for that salt shaker. The vast variety of herbs and spices make your choices limitless. If you want something sweeter, consider using cinnamon or vanilla, and for spiciness, use chili powder or cayenne pepper. Try pepper or garlic instead of salt; just be careful to refrain from garlic salts, as these are just as high in sodium as regular salt.

Herbs also add a nice array of flavors and can give your dishes a potent kick by using a small number of dry ones or by using freshly chopped herbs. Do not be afraid to experiment. You will be pleasantly surprised as to how these flavors can make your mouth water.

You have heard me preach about TUMERIC.

 

 

 

Fact: Eating too much sodium can be harmful to your health.

About 20% of adults have high blood pressure and almost 30% of those cases are as a result of too much sodium! People are consuming more than 3,400 mg of sodium daily. The recommended intake for sodium is about 1,500 mg with a maximum amount of no more than 2,300 mg daily. That means that most people are consuming more than 1,000 mg above the maximum recommended levels.

Consuming such high levels of sodium can lead to several health complications, such as high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Additionally, it can be detrimental to your kidneys—especially for people with diabetes.

 

Myth: I don’t have high blood pressure, so I don’t need to watch my salt intake.

You always need to be ahead of the game when it comes to your health. It is important to make sure that you have a healthful, balanced diet that is rich in vegetables and fruits, whole grains, lean protein, and low-fat dairy in order to prevent many debilitating diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. It is just as important to watch your salt intake to prevent high blood pressure and any health ailments that may come your way as a result of not taking preventative care of yourself.

It is easy to not have to worry about things while you are healthy, but that is the most important time to stay on top of it all. You want to maintain that health; therefore, you want to ensure that you watch your eating habits and participate in regular physical activity in order to prevent your health from deteriorating.

Fact: Kosher salt, sea salt, gourmet salt and smoked salt all have about the same amount of sodium as table salt.

Many people seem to think that one kind of salt is healthier than the other. To be honest, it is all about your own taste preferences. They all contain similar amounts of sodium, provide the same nutrients, perform the same functions, and can have the same effects on your health. Do not let anyone try to convince you otherwise.

Exception!

Iodized salt is a must to have.  It is the only food that is iodized and this is important for normal thyroid function!

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

  1. Carrothers

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

Health and Wellness Associates on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

Foods

5 Foods that have more sodium than chips

cottagecheese

5 foods that have more sodium than chips

Your body needs sodium—but there’s no denying that most of

us are getting way too much of it. According to recent stats from the American

Heart Association, the average daily sodium intake in this country is 3,600

milligrams—more than double the Association’s recommendation of 1,500

milligrams max. But avoiding clear offenders like salted nuts and potato chips

may not be enough to bring you down into the recommended range since there are

so many sneaky salt bombs out there. Just look at these seemingly healthful

foods—they all contain more than 255 milligrams of sodium, which is the amount

you’ll find in a 1 ½-ounce bag of Lays Classic Potato Chips.  Remember all

products are commercially prepared and do not confused sodium with salt.

1/2 Cup Nonfat Cottage Cheese

This packs a surprising 270 milligrams of sodium—and if you’re not careful,

it’s easy to eat more than ½ cup and really overdo it with the salty

stuff.

A 6 1/2″ Whole-Wheat Pita 

Pitas come with a health halo—especially when they’re whole-wheat—and they can

be a good source of fiber. But they also come with a heavy dose of sodium: 284

milligrams in just one pocket.

2 Tbsp Reduced-Fat Italian Salad Dressing

Yup, you can take in more sodium in 2 Tbsp of your salad topper than in an

entire bag of chips: This variety is loaded with 260 mg per serving—although

plenty of other types of salad dressing pack just as much.

Veggie Burger

While the exact stats will of course vary from brand to

brand, the USDA says that one store-bought veggie burger patty tends to come in

around 398 milligrams of sodium—and that’s before you even consider all of the

salt in the bun (many types of bread are just as salty as pitas, if not more

so).

1/2 Cup Canned Tomato Sauce

Tomato sauce has its virtues—it contains lycopene, for example, a carotenoid

that research has linked to a decreased risk of heart disease and certain types

of cancer. But you have to eat it in moderation since each ½-cup serving packs

a shocking 642 milligrams of sodium.