Blog Archives

Get UP for Pulled Muscles and Sprains

pulledmuscle

 

Get up for Pulled Muscles and Sprains

 

If you’ve really injured yourself (with shin splints, a pulled muscle, or a sprain, for example), you need downtime to heal; otherwise it’s important to keep moving.

 

“Activating a sore muscle is better than resting it,” says Stephen P. Sayers, PhD, an assistant professor of physical therapy at the University of Missouri Columbia. ”

 

Getting the blood flowing to those muscles will reduce inflammation and help them heal.

 

Choose a less strenuous exercise to do for a few days; then gradually work your way back up to a harder routine.”

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

Dr. J. Jaranson

Orthopaedics

312-972-9355

 

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HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

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One Patients RA Treatment. Did it Work?

RA

 

Sarah’s RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis )  Treatment

 

When I first saw Sarah, we discussed her diet, and I suggested there might be a genetic influence involved as she’s Scottish-Irish. Many of her family members also had autoimmune problems, including multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Her genetic background suggested she may have an intolerance of wheat and gluten.

“You said I should eliminate that out of my diet as well as processed foods and sugar. You also did a metabolic typing. I did a very thorough questionnaire about how I metabolize food, about my energy levels, and about the stress in my life.

 

Along with my blood type, I was given a very special protocol of which foods would help me heal… I did a lot of vegetable juicing, which really helped me. I juiced probably 48 ounces a day of green juice.

 

I also ate a lot of organic grass-fed beef, ostrich, bison, free-range chicken and raw dairy. You even recommended raw eggs and raw egg yolks. Because I was in Wisconsin, I found an organic farm close to me. I got most of my meat, raw milk and my eggs from there. I bought all my fresh vegetables from local farmers markets. I got to know area farmers and learn about their farming practices.

 

I would buy a variety of vegetables and meats from them because I knew how they grew their food and raised their animals. I even used to meet the ostrich farmer in a parking lot across from the co-op where she used to sell her meats and buy it direct at a lower price. I also incorporated a lot of probiotics in my diet, and increased my vitamin D levels. Instead of suppressing my immune system with drugs to control my disease, I was using food to redesign my immune system and make it as strong as possible.

 

Apart from diet, the other important issue you advised me to address was the level of stress in my life. At that time, I was a teacher, new and passionate about the field. I worked very long hours, beyond what was healthy. Additionally, I dedicated several hours per week to triathlon training, and had some emotional stress in my life is well.

 

You, emphasized how stress and emotions impact immunity and now that I am studying Eastern medicine I have learned it is one of the primary causes of disease. I still question whether it was the amount of work and stress in my life which triggered the onset of my disease.

 

I cut back on the amount I was working and doing, and made more time for rest and enjoyment. You, also taught me Emotional Freedom Technique, a method of tapping along traditional energetic acupuncture meridians to help relieve emotional issues. I began incorporating EFT into my daily life, which was a simple and time-effective method to help me better deal with everyday stress and anxiety.

 

The Importance of Vitamin D

 

Vitamin D is a really important component. It stimulates 200 to 300 anti-microbial peptides that are even more powerful than antibiotics, which help improve and regulate your immune system and fight infections. Sarah, as many others with RA, noticed her symptoms were at their worst during the winter, and would often dissipate during the summer. This is what you call a giant clue that vitamin D is at work…

 

Invariably, unless you’re aggressively addressing your vitamin D level with sun exposure or supplementation, your blood levels of vitamin D will drop to dangerously low levels sometime in January, February, or March, when sun exposure is at its lowest. Optimizing your vitamin D is extremely important.

Essentially, if you’re using a supplement, you need to take whatever dosage is required to reach and maintain a therapeutic level, which can only be done by a healthcare worker that understands this.

Nourishing your gut microbiome is another important component. In addition to eating more fermented foods, it’s equally important to cut out sugar from your diet as it will feed pathogenic microbes and decimate your immune system, leaving you susceptible to autoimmune diseases of all kinds.

“I learned how to ferment my own vegetables and dairy products. I made my own kombucha, yogurt, cultured butters, milk kefir and coconut kefir. It took almost two years to get my system in balance, but right away, I noticed a difference.

In about two weeks my cravings for wheat, breads, and sugar diminished… My healthcare worker also told me that I had leaky gut and digestive proteins in my bloodstream.

 

I talked to my healthcare team, and after three months after being very strict with the diet. I felt better; I’d lost about 10 pounds. I had so much more energy and felt lighter. But when they did my analysis and showed me was — that I had completely changed — that’s when I really believed that food was medicine…

 

I was able to resume my regular activities… I was able to return to racing. That year, after following your protocol for about a year, I actually won an entire triathlon… So I went from being told I’d never run again to winning a race. Slowly, slowly the symptoms diminished. After two years of being very strict [with my diet], my symptoms went to complete remission, and they’ve stayed that way. It’s been over 10 years.

 

I still work out. Right now, I train Brazilian capoeira, which incorporates martial arts, dance, and acrobatics. I’m still able to do gymnastics. I can still do back flips at age 43. I still run occasionally. I still swim and bike. I do yoga and cross-country skiing when I’m in the north. So, I’m very active and very healthy. In fact, I feel that by you helping me, it really extended my life. I feel much younger than my age.”

 

I just want to wish Sarah the best, and her testimony we hope is helpful for others.

 

Sarah did go through more steps than she had wrote about, but

There IS Hope for RA Patients!

 

 

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

 

HealthWellnessAssociates@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/HealthAndWellnessAssociates/

 

Diverticulitis: Prevention and Treatment

diverticulitis

Diverticulitis Prevention: Can You Avoid This Illness?

 

The best strategy to prevent diverticulitis is to consume a diet with high amounts of fiber. Adequate amounts of fiber in your stool can help prevent constipation, allowing waste to move easily and preventing you from putting pressure on the colon during bowel movements.

 

Dietary fiber also fuels beneficial bacteria to produce compounds that help regulate your immune function.There are two kinds of fiber in foods, namely soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and forms a gel-like material that makes stools softer and larger, so they can be passed easily through the intestine.

 

Meanwhile, insoluble fiber absorbs water and adds bulk to stool, which helps move waste through the digestive system. You can get both soluble and insoluble fiber from plant-based foods. To ensure that you’re getting equal amounts of both, you should add a wide variety of fiber-rich foods in your meals.

 

For example you can take organic psyllium. It contains both soluble and insoluble fiber and not only promotes healthy digestion, but also heart health, weight control, blood sugar support, and more.

 

Just three servings of psyllium per day can give you as much as 18 grams of dietary fiber, bringing you closer to the recommended minimum of 50 grams per 1,000 calories consumed.

 

Have a health professional go over your vitamins and supplement intake first before you add anything to it.  Taking psyllium along with other supplements can cause you must distress.

 

Physicians have previously recommended diverticulitis patients to avoid eating nuts, seeds, and popcorn, as they believe these can get lodged in the pouches and cause or worsen the infection.

 

However, modern research1 found that there’s no evidence linking these foods with diverticular disease, and therefore may be safe to eat.2 Other ways to help prevent diverticulitis – or diverticular disease in general – include:3

 

  • Avoid overconsumption of red meat.

 

  • Avoid foods loaded with unhealthy fats, as they may lead to intestinal blockage and worsen diverticulitis symptoms.

 

  • Get enough regular exercise.

 

  • Drink plenty of liquids, ideally pure clear water. This is especially important if you are consuming a high-fiber diet. Without enough fluids, the fiber will only add bulk to the stool and will not soften it, which may lead to constipation.

 

  • Maintain a healthy body weight.

 

  • Quit smoking. Smokers have a higher risk of complications from diverticulitis.

 

  • Do not take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), as they have been linked to diverticular bleeding.

 

  • Reduce your caffeine intake. Some people think that drinking coffee can help their stools to pass, but this is actually a wrong approach. Caffeine is a diuretic that can lead you to lose water in your body, causing stools to harden. Excessive caffeine may also cause your colon muscles to contract, preventing stool from passing through smoothly.4

 

  • Do not delay your bowel movements. This can harden stools and increase the strain on your colon muscles, which can then lead to diverticular disease. You should be having three bowel movements per day to keep a healthy colon.

 

 

 

 

Diverticulitis Diet: Foods to Eat and What to Avoid

 

If you have a mild case of diverticulitis, your physician will likely prescribe a specific diet as part of your treatment plan. While it may not completely treat the illness, it can give your digestive system a chance to “rest,” so that it can recover from the infection.

 

Most physicians will recommend that you consume a high-fiber diet. Fiber softens your stools, allowing them to pass through your intestines and colon more quickly and easily. Some of the best fiber-rich foods include:1, 2

 

  • Vegetables (artichokes, Brussels sprouts, carrots, peas, and broccoli) and vegetable juices

 

  • Fruits, including raspberries, blackberries, pears, apples, and avocados

 

  • Potatoes

 

  • Legumes, such as navy beans, kidney beans, black beans, lima beans, and split peas

 

  • Whole grains, such as brown rice, quinoa, and bulgur

 

But in severe diverticulitis cases, switching to a high-fiber diet too soon may not be effective, and may only worsen the symptoms. Instead, your physician will likely recommend a clear liquid diet first.3

 

Liquids You Can Take for Diverticulitis

 

Start by eating homemade bone broth, made from lamb, beef, chicken, or fish, and with some cooked vegetables and meat. This will help heal leaky gut syndrome, boost your immune system, and heal the digestive tract.4

 

Bone broth provides you with easily digestible nutrients, such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon and sulfur. The gelatinous collagen in bone broth also has amazing curative properties. It is a hydrophilic colloid that attracts and holds liquids, including digestive juices, hence supporting proper digestion.

 

Aside from pure and clear water, Ginger tea is another soothing drink that you should add to your diet. Sip on warm ginger tea two to three times daily, as it will help reduce inflammation and aid in digestion. This healing food works wonders on your immune and digestive systems.

 

Other Recommended Foods for Diverticulitis

 

Once your diverticulitis symptoms have lessened, you can move on to consuming easily digestible foods, ideally grated, steamed, and pureed fruits and vegetables. Avoid those that have tough skins and small seeds that may accumulate in the diverticula sacs. Some of the best choices are carrots, beets, grapes, apples, lettuce, and watercress. You can juice them, but leave out the fibrous areas until your body has adjusted to them.

 

When you feel better, you can start to add fiber-rich foods, including raw fruits and vegetables and unrefined grains, such as fermented grains, black rice, quinoa, and sprouted lentils, to your diet.

 

Remember that digestion starts in the mouth, so make it a habit to chew each bite of your food thoroughly, or until it is nearly liquefied. The more you break down the food before it goes to your stomach, the more readily absorbed the nutrients become.5

 

Food plays a great role in how you manage diverticulitis, so remember to discuss your diet needs and restrictions with your physician. Write down your questions, and make sure that you clarify which foods are safe and which ones are not. You can also ask for a referral to a nutrition specialist who can help you come up with a well-balanced meal plan to alleviate your condition.6

 

IF you have any questions or concerns about prevention of this disease or any disease please call us.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived

312-972-WELL

How to Cure a Cold

saltwater

 

Cure A Cold With Saltwater

 

Got a cold?  Gargling with saltwater can soothe away symptoms like a sore throat and sniffles, reducing the odds of that cold turning into an upper respiratory infection by  40%.

 

Gargling removes microscopic viruses from your throat and airways, which is key for keeping them from triggering a serious illness, researchers explain.  At the same time, gargling with saltwater loosens mucous and soothes irritated throat tissues, so you feel better faster.

 

ALSO:  Be Kind Too!

Simple acts of kindness, like running an errand for a homebound neighbor, makes your immune system more robust, a study from Bishop’s University in Canada reveals.  Acting with compassion releases a cascade of protective hormones and immunity improving chemical messengers the study authors say.

 

Please share with family and loved ones.  Call us if you are having problems with reoccurring respiratory infections, or any healthcare concern.

Health and Wellness Associates

Archived:  P. Carrothers

312-972-WELL

Congestion Relief

clementins

Congestion Reliever

Cold season is here, buy you can minimize sniffling and stuffiness with clementines.

A USDA study found that this easy to peel fruit is packed with synephrine, a natual

Antihistamine that reduces nose and throat inflammation and slows the production of mucus.

Great ideas:  Add Clementine segments into your favorite chicken or beef stir-fry dishes.

Also: Toss peeled and thinly sliced clementines, chopped carrots, and chopped parsnips with coconut oil, then roast in a 425 degree oven for 40 minutes

Health and Wellness Associates

312-972-WELL

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