Health and Disease

HWA-RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS COMPLICATIONS AND PREVENTIONS

Does RA Have Serious Complications?

It can. Side effects from rheumatoid arthritis are manifestations of the condition itself and come in two varieties: those from untreated or undertreated RA, and those caused by joint damage.  Common complications of RA include:

  • Heart Disease. It affects more than half of all people with RA.
  • Rheumatoid nodules, which occur in 30% to 40% of RA patients and are more bothersome than painful.
  • Osteoporosis-related fractures. These are 25% to 30% more common in people with RA than the general population.
  • Infections (flu, staph, pneumonia). They’re twice as common in people with RA.
  • Lung Disease. It develops in nearly one-fourth of RA patients.
  • Dry Eye. This is the most common eye complaint for people with RA.

About 10% of people diagnosed with RA (and diligently treated) experience complete remission within one year, and roughly 40% go into remission within two years. That’s thanks to significant advances in treatment over the past two decades.

This is exactly why it’s so critical not to ignore symptoms—or to put off getting help. If the disease progresses and is not treated, that’s when the worst side effects can occur: severely restricted range of motion or, worse, gradual destruction of the joints. The inflammatory process slows down as fibrous tissue forms or bones fuse, and joints stop functioning altogether.

Prevention

While there is no known way to keep from getting rheumatoid arthritis, there are plenty of steps you can take to prevent complications and feel better overall. If you have not gone into remission after two years, you are not following a healthy lifestyle as written below.

  • Quit smoking. A Swedish study of 34,101 women reported that even light cigarette smoking is associated with increased risk of RA in women and that quitting (or not starting at all) may reduce the risk.
  • Maintain a healthy weight to ease pressure on your joints. If you are overweight, you may want to consider a weight-loss plan, as excess pounds can put unnecessary stress on your joints. Consider working with a dietitian to help build a personalized diet or program that targets your specific goals (i.e. less sugar and more omega-3 fatty acids/fish) for managing your RA.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Anti inflammatory diet for RA if a must, aim to avoid foods that cause inflammation, like processed food, quick fast food , packaged snacks,and include foods that promote bone health and immune function. No dairy, white flour, white sugar or anything with OSE in the ingredients. No glucose, fructose or dextrose.
  • Start or keep up with an exercise routine. Research shows that exercise can help alleviate RA symptoms and even improve day-to-day functioning. It can also make you more flexible, help you sleep better, and boost your endurance. Every morning you should start the day with the same stretching routine. Touch those toes more times each day. You can find many great exercises online that you do every morning. These are different than the light weight lifting and aerobic exercises at a gym. You actually do not need to ever go to a gym. Do not work with a trainer who is not a therapeutic physical therapist associated with a hospital.

VITAMINS AND SUPPLEMENTS

Please work with someone who is trained to deal with supplements on a patient to patient basis. No two people are the same, and should not be treated as the same. Men and women would definitely have different supplements recommended for them. Always ask ” What supplements would you recommend for my spouse?” If they say the same ones, WRONG!

We are in this Together!-

-People Start to Heal The Moment They Are Heard-

Health and Wellness Associates

EHS Telehealth

REVIEWED BY DR R Ryan

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Lifestyle

Meditation is as effective as antidepressant drugs

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Meditation is just as effective as antidepressant drugs in treating anxiety or depression, but without the side effects, according to a study conducted by researchers from Johns Hopkins University and published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. The study was funded by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The researchers analyzed the results of 47 prior randomized, controlled trials conducted on a total of 3,515 people suffering from depression, anxiety, insomnia, heart disease, chronic pain, stress and other health conditions. In all the trials analyzed, mindfulness meditation had been compared to a placebo or to other treatments. Mindfulness meditation consists of the regular practice, often 30 to 40 minutes per day, of a person remaining aware of their surroundings (such as sounds), thoughts and emotions, without forming attachment to their outcomes. This is in contrast with concentration practices, in which a person focuses on a single thought or activity (such as chanting or looking at a candle) to the exclusion of all other thoughts. “Many people have the idea that meditation means just sitting quietly and doing nothing,” researcher Madhav Goyal said. “That is not true. It is an active training of the mind to increase awareness, and different meditation programs approach this in different ways.” According to the National Institutes of Health, roughly 9 percent of U.S. residents meditated at least once in 2007, while about 1 percent said that they used meditation as a medical treatment.

Effect similar to drugs

The researchers found that people who underwent a roughly eight-week mindfulness training practice experienced a 5 to 10 percent reduction in anxiety symptoms compared to placebo groups, and a 10 to 20 percent reduction in depression symptoms. The research also suggested that meditation led to significant reductions in pain, although these findings were not conclusive. “This is similar to the effects that other studies have found for the use of antidepressants in similar populations,” Goyal said. Little or no effect was found in the other areas of chronic health studied, such as attention, sleep, weight or substance abuse. “Our review suggests that there is moderate evidence for a small but consistent benefit for anxiety, depression and chronic pain,” Goyal said. “There is no known major harm from meditating, and meditation doesn’t come with any known side effects. One can also practice meditation along with other treatments one is already receiving.”

Meditation for its own sake

The findings suggest that mindfulness meditation may be useful as a substitute or complement to drugs for many chronic conditions, Allan Goroll of Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital wrote in an accompanying editorial. “The findings of such research should be the subject of conversations that need to begin in every examination room and extend to engage the media, who play a key role in determining patient attitudes toward health care and the demand for services,” Goroll wrote. Goyal also called for health providers to educate patients about the benefits of meditation. “Clinicians should be prepared to talk with their patients about the role that meditation programs could have in addressing psychological stress, particularly when symptoms are mild,” he said. Meditation is not a cure-all, Goyal warned, but it can still provide significant benefits, even above and beyond the treatment of chronic conditions. “We should keep foremost in our mind that meditation was never conceived of as a treatment for any health problem,” Goyal said. “Rather, it is a path one travels on to increase our awareness and gain insight into our lives. The best reason to meditate is to increase insight into one’s life which is probably good for everyone.” Sources for this article include: http://www.bloomberg.com http://science.naturalnews.com Health and Wellness Associates

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